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Foster

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About Foster

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  • Birthday 01/12/1964

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  1. Dear John, thank you very, very much. That was extremely helpful and informative. Of course I would choose a design/color option that is so complicated, expensive, and nearly impossible to do--lol. I'm going to get Rossol's book and check out the FDA regulations. Good to know this. And I'm going to continue to explore this stain/glaze, just to see if I can make it work... But not on functional ware. In the meantime, I guess I'll find another glaze solution for this set of bisque dinnerware, and start over again with a cone 6 body and use a cadmium-free orange glaze! John, can you recommend a cone 6 body (or formula) that is 'tight and strong', and preferably white, for functional ware? Are you familiar with Highwater's Little Loafers? Thanks all for your help, it's a very interesting thread.
  2. Oh wow. So then do I understand correctly that cadmium colorants are not FDA approved for functional ware, even in encapsulated stains--despite Cerdec/Degussa's claims that they are food safe? If so, how is that one can buy all sorts of red/orange ceramic dinnerware just about everywhere, from Walmart to Pier One? Are these manufactured dishes mostly likely low fire cadmium free colors? Is there no way then to make orange, high fire, functional pottery?
  3. Thanks Marcia, I did do tests with of the stain (10%) in a Hamada clear base--also turned brown. The Loafer's Glory is a white stoneware, I'm going to try porcelain next time. Here's my dilemma: I am using a clay body that has a firing 'range' of 6-10. I'm making functional ware, and I want to be sure it is vitrified, so I want to fire to cone 10. However, the studio I'm working at (St Pete clay company) only fires cone10 reduction. They also do a cone 6 oxidation, but I worry about the durability of the ware at cone 6. Maybe I should fire to cone 10. Then glaze and down-fire in oxidation?
  4. Thanks Marcia, I did do tests with of the stain (10%) in a Hamada clear base--also turned brown. The Loafer's Glory is a white stoneware, I'm going to try porcelain next time. Here's my dilemma: I am using a clay body that has a firing 'range' of 6-10. I'm making functional ware, and I want to be sure it is vitrified, so I want to fire to cone 10. However, the studio I'm working at (St Pete clay company) only fires cone10 reduction. They also do a cone 6 oxidation, but I worry about the durability of the ware at cone 6. Maybe I should fire to cone 10. Then glaze and down-fire in oxidation?
  5. Well, I made a couple test glazes with the Degussa orange stains. Still comes out BROWN in cone 10 reduction. The closest orange I got was kind of a burnt sienna by adding 10% of the stain to a Haynes white recipe on the Loafer's Glory stoneware. Any suggestions what I should try next? Should I add more stain? Is there a better base recipe? What if I tried mixing a stain or slip and clear over? (I am working with bisque ware). Commercial orange underglaze seems to work fairly well, if not a bit smokey, but the lightest bit of clear glaze turns it completely brown. Any suggestions please?
  6. Are you firing with gas or electric and is there a reason your working at cone 10. The higher you fire the fewer variations you have in oxides or stains. Since you are new to clay you might consider working at cone 6. You can purchase underglazes premixed to experiment with, they still burn out some at cone 6 but nothing like cone 10, you can usually get a color chart with them that shows the intensity of the under glaze at different temperatures. I work with a Majolica glaze at cone 1, I want my colors to be fairly bright but also have the pieces vitrified for outdoor use. Denice (Wichita, KS) Hi this is Denice To answer your question about the vitrification, I am using a Laguna low fire red terra cotta. I did all of the freeze test I could find and made a talavera tile mural and laid it out in the Kansas winter. The vertical installation the tile wouldn't get that much snow and ice covering it like the mural on the ground. I bisque to Cone 02, I have to pour the glaze on the tiles and let them dry, cone 02 is nearly vitrified for that clay. If your going to apply the glaze in a different manner you may have to bisque to a lower cone. I bisque at 02 with this particular clay because it eliminates almost all of the white impurity dots that show up in the majolica glaze surface. I tested clays and glazes for nearly a year before I was satisfied with the results. If you don,t have a test kiln, get one they are a time and energy saver. Denice Wichita,KS Hi Denise, thank you so much! --Foster
  7. For a sure fire orange in ^10 reduction you may need to use Degussa stains. Marcia THANK YOU MARCIA! I'm going to try it asap!
  8. So if you are firing your Majolica glaze to cone 1, how are you getting your pieces vitrified? Are you firing with gas or electric and is there a reason your working at cone 10. The higher you fire the fewer variations you have in oxides or stains. Since you are new to clay you might consider working at cone 6. You can purchase underglazes premixed to experiment with, they still burn out some at cone 6 but nothing like cone 10, you can usually get a color chart with them that shows the intensity of the under glaze at different temperatures. I work with a Majolica glaze at cone 1, I want my colors to be fairly bright but also have the pieces vitrified for outdoor use. Denice (Wichita, KS)
  9. Very interesting discussion! I have similar questions. I trying to make brightly colored, highfire, functional tableware and oven ware. I recently switched clay from Phoenix to Loafer's Glory in order to get a whiter/smoother body. Highwater ranks this clay at cone 6-10 (and I agree it seems crazy to me to have such a large range for vitrification). I have been firing at cone 10 in gas reduction and the clay body appears to vitrify. I want to use bright colored underglazes (especially orange) on a white body (Loafer's Glory). But the oranges come out brown and muddy. I understand that the colors will be brighter and hold up better in lower firings like cone 06 or even cone 6 oxidation. But I want to make sure the ware is fucntional and vitrified so that can be used in the dishwasher, microwave, oven, etc. So I'm trying to figure out what to do. Should I just underglaze and fire to cone 6 and hope for the best, or should i try a high fire oxidation instead of reduction, or should I switch to a clay body that matures at cone 6--like Little Loafers——OR——can I bisque the pieces to cone 10 (so that they are fully vitrified) and then spray on an underglaze and clear coat and refire down to cone 06 or 6—or will the color/glaze not absorb b/c it is vitrified? What I'm trying to ask is—how can I get bright underglaze colors on highfire, vitrified stoneware--or porcelain for that matter. Of course I have seen this done all over the place. There has to be an simple solution, no?
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