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OOF!

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About OOF!

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    Newbie
  • Birthday 04/14/1973

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  • Interests
    music, ceramics, Tour de France
  1. Making Slip

    At the risk of killing yet another thread, I will chime in. I agree with the above potters, to use the clay which you use to make your work. The advantages are that it is readily available, and will not present problems with shrinkage/fit. I like to throw using a clay grogged with a 40 mesh mullite. I tried using it as a slip to brush over pots so that I would get a smoother surface to burnish. The grog presented a problem, as now seems obvious, it was never going to give me the smooth surface I wanted. So I started to dry out my clay completely, slake it and then put the "slip" through a 100 mesh sieve, and I now get what I call "psuedo-sig," as it is so silky and smooth, and gives me a great surface. So almost any clay can give you good slip, if you prep it right, I guess.
  2. Pottery Books

    Two or three years ago, eBay was where I got many pottery books for a song. I think the selection is not as good as it used to be, but you could try there. Prices can be quite good, I remember winning one book for about $2.00 or so, and the seller was a bit peeved. She e-mailed me "You got that book for a steal!" ( hey it's not my fault, that's the way eBay can be, right?) She had the last laugh though; I won another book from her soon after that, and she charged me double the posted shipping price! I emailed her asking what was up, but she never answered. I really wanted the book, so I ponied up.
  3. There are about 200 blogs listed here: http://wikiclay.com/...yceramics-blogs I have added many(most of the) blogs to this list, because it is a wiki. This site is the idea and property of Simon Levin and Lloyd Cledwyn. It's how I get to Zygote's blog and many others every day. There is another site with a longer list of blogs, however, it contains some that are not clay/pottery related, and I am hesitant to recommend it because I was reading a blog listed there about a year and a half ago, and picked up a nasty virus that had my computer limping along for a month, 'til I was able to get rid of it. I don't remember the blog name, so I can't tell you which one to avoid. Anyway, I've never had a problem at Wikiclay. I have added almost all the above blogs to WIkiclay.
  4. Music For The Making

    IF you have a computer with internet connection in your studio, you can listen to almost anything at Rhapsody.com: http://www.rhapsody.com/home.html I think they have a plan that costs $10.95/month, and you can make your own playlists from their thousands of albums. I have been quite suprised at the depth of their collection, as I listen to the most obscure music available, and have found many gems right on rhapsody. I use this service several hours a day, and would probably die without it. If you like Latin guitar/flamenco/fado, you may have heard of Rodrigo y Gabriela, two young guitarists who were in the Mexican thrash metal band Terra Acido. They took up acoustic flamenco guitars, and are bringing flamenco to new generations who might never have heard of it, or have written it off. They really are good.
  5. Glaze Mixing Services

    When we order 15,000 grams (33 lbs.) each, of four glazes, they will use flat rate Priority shipping, and each ten pounds of glaze comes in a blue labelled plastic bag, wire tied, and that bag comes in a labelled brown paper bag, sealed with paper/plastic tape. Some of our shipments have been left out in the rain, and the boxes got a little soft, but the glaze was okay. Lately the PO has been leaving a notice for us to come and pick them up; probably tired of loading 120 lbs of glaze into the truck every day. I don't know why they don't just leave them by our door, who is going to steal them? We're probably the only potters for miles around. My only gripe with them, and it is a minor one, is that a lot of the glazes on their site don't have photos, so you can get an idea of what they MIGHT turn out to be, but that is a very tiny quibble.
  6. Glaze Mixing Services

    We have used glazemixer.com since 2007, and they have been very good. I don't want to keep little containers of all the materials I could possibly need, or want to experiment with, so we use them. We have always ordered dry glazes, and mix them ourselves, no use paying to ship water, unless you have a special need to do so. If you order a large amount of glaze (we have ordered 100 lbs ata time) you might have to go to the post office to pick up your boxes. They have been accurate, and I have recommended them to several people.
  7. Hi Palandri, I have tried to use the Gault books on a few occasions, and I can't. I don't know what it is, but I can't get anything cohesive out of them, I don't know if it is my reading or her style/organization, but "it don't work." I haven't tried the other book. I would suggest that, if your local library has an interlibrary loan program, that you try to borrow these books from another library, to save money. To do that, I do as follows: Google the title of the book - say "Paper Clay (Ceramics Handbooks) - Rosette Gault" for example. Then use the menu bar at the top of Google, and click on the "more" tab (last on right.) At the top of the drop down menu will be "Books" if you click on that , Google will list books on the subject, in this case, paper clay. Click on the title of the book you want. Details of the book will come up, and you can clikc on "Find in a library." Worldcat, a worldwide catalog of books will come up and automatically find the llibraries near you that you might be able to borrow the books from, saving you $. Hope this helps.
  8. Kiln Board Overheating

    Hi Lucy, I have a Envirovented Skutt 1027 which I fire in our 20 X 22' garage. It has been in the low 90's here this summer, and we have had one instance of our board getting too hot, and shutting the kiln down. On these hot days, the garage will often get above 100º F, so we use a box fan to help cool the board. Apperently the position of the fan can have an effect on the cooling, when we had the overheating problem, I had placed the fan to blow up over the top of the kiln, so as to deflect the heat and hopefully cool. The board overheated, apparently from some type of air circulation pattern that I didn't expect. After restarting the kiln, the board temp again went to 152º F, so I quickly put the box fan on the floor, almost directly underneath the control box. I raised the top of the fan about 6" using a little box, so that the fan was blowing up at a steep angle, perhaps 75º. The fan was sucking the cooler air near the floor, and pushing it through the bottom louvers. Within ten minutes the board temp had dropped from 152º F to 130º F; I left the fan there for the remainder of the firing. I don't think the Envirovent cools the kiln much at all, it removes fumes. It uses a squirrel cage fan, and I don't think these remove heat as much as other designs. When my kiln is at about 2000º F, I can safely put my hand under the outlet of the vent, and it is only slightly warm. Why Skutt would state that damage to the board can result at 160 F, and then give you instructions to raise the temp to 180 is a bit puzzling. So what is the REAL story with the board? I hope this might be of some help.
  9. Clayart Dead?

    Here's a good example that Clayart, for all the good that is does, is outmoded. It's 2010, not 1950. I find that a "discussion," of whether racist jokes should be allowed on a ceramics listserv, astounding. It is a CERAMICS discussion, for crying out loud! What possible use could devisive jokes serve to a ceramics group? It's unnecessary, in my opinion, and should not even be allowed, much less discussed. There are a million other platforms for that kind of thing on the 'net, should you be so inclined. I'm just guessing, but I think racism is OUT in 2010. I should be quite suprised to find that kind of thing on this forum; I think the way forward is clear. (And i RARELY use emoticons. Very rarely. Almost never. In fact, this might be the first time in two years.)
  10. How Much Lpg?

    Although they are based in Tennessee, USA, Ward burner Systems has a good bit of technical help in the "Technical info" section of their web site (as you might expect.) It might be of some use to someone living outside the US. wardburnersystems
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