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JohnnyK

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About JohnnyK

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    JohnnyK

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Citrus Heights, CA
  • Interests
    Ceramics, glazing techniques, photography, farming, reading all kinds of stuff but primarily thrillers

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  1. What brand of controller did you buy, Dom? I've got an Orton unit that I've found very easy to program and use, with the capability to write and save a number of "User-defined" programs that have been very successful in my firings. JohnnyK
  2. new saggar and obvara pieces

    Beautiful work, as usual, Marcia...you are an inspiration! JohnnyK
  3. Glaze test question

    I agree with Mark with regard to the testing. Do you have an extruder that you can use to squirt out the form for the test tiles? If so, make the slightly angled form as tall as you can with some ridges for other impressions so you can see how the glazes break and pool. If no extruder, can you throw a circular form with an outward shape and an outward extended foot or an inward shape that you can ultimately slice into pieces for your tests? Third option would be to roll a slab, slice it into strips and bend them into an angled L shape. I've seen and used all three methods. JohnnyK
  4. Choosing clay types

    Your supplier should have some test pieces for you to look at before you make your choices. If not, maybe you can ask them to fire some pieces for you or get them from the manufacturer. My local suppliers have test samples displayed for all the clay bodies they sell... JohnnyK
  5. Re-firing low fire glaze

    I've used the hairspray trick for a couple of ^6 reglazes and found it to be helpful when brushing the Amaco Potters Choice glazes without additional CMC. As with everything glazes, run some tests, even if it means using scrap pieces rather than your good sculptures to see if you can duplicate results. I have a very small collection of bisque "failures" that I keep around for just this purpose. Give it a shot, Gregory...the only thing you have to lose is time. JohnnyK
  6. In the process of designing and building a portable Raku kiln. Will be doing a bisque firing of the blanket buttons as well as some pots to fire when the kiln is done...

    1. Denice

      Denice

      Sounds like fun I have often thought about turning a small old electric kiln into a raku kiln on wheels.  I have another old electric kiln bite the dust.  I will hang on to it for awhile in case I get ambitious.   Denice

  7. Hi ISY, I've been where you are now with the firing "inconsistencies" on an old kiln. The witness cones are a big help in getting things straight. What you'll have to do is compensate in the case of the bisque firing by either setting a higher finish temp on the controller or setting a longer soak time at the end of your current program. As for the ^8 firing, a lower finish temp and/or a shorter soak time at the end, will be the order of the day. Neil just beat me to what I just said. :-) JohnnyK
  8. Underglaze cell separation

    Welcome to the Forum, James! The best way to find out if the silicone will work is to try the technique on a test piece. JohnnyK
  9. Hi Evagellos and welcome to the Forum! You might check out Sumi von Dassow's book "In the Potter's Kitchen" where you can find pretty much anything you need to know about what you want to do. Welcome to the fascinating world of clay and GOOD LUCK! JohnnyK
  10. Kiln fired too hot

    You may have inadvertently used a^6 bar in the kiln sitter. The cups were probably a low-fire clay, hence the melted mess. It doesn't look like you used witness cones which would have given an indication of what had happened. The shelves are probably a total loss. You can try to chisel the melts off and if successful, grind the remaining debris off the shelves. You can probably CAREFULLY grind the melts off the kiln wall, but if that doesn't work, rebuilding the kiln might be necessary. JohnnyK
  11. Help with drying

    Does the studio have a drying cabinet? If so, You can use Mea's suggestion with the fabric and if the piece is not dry enough, pop it into the drying cabinet until it is dry enough to trim. JohnnyK
  12. Grinding tool

    You might take a look at these tools from Harbor Freight. I've used something similar for grinding glaze off shelves, but it has to be done with a light touch or you'll wind up grinding grooves into the shelves. The price is right for what you want to do. My grinder is a Makita that I used to use in my remodeling business. Good luck... JohnnyK https://www.harborfreight.com/4-12-in-43-amp-angle-grinder-69645.html https://www.harborfreight.com/4-inch-grinding-wheel-for-masonry-39676.html
  13. Crazy requests

    Bondo might have worked...
  14. Probably not because the fresh clay, as it dries prior to firing, will shrink, while the fired clay will not shrink during the drying process. Then when you fire it, the fresh clay will shrink even faster and if it did not pull away from the fired clay while drying, it will surely do so in the kiln. JohnnyK
  15. Question on mixing colorant batches

    I am guessing that you are mixing the first batch dry, adding water to bring the SG to dipping level, dipping the tile and then adding another 5% cobalt to the wet mix to bring it up to 10%. If so, I think that dipping the tile will reduce the original volume and adding the additional 5% would bring the concentration to slightly more than 10%. Not so much a problem with cobalt, but when you get into adding fractions of a %, it could be detrimental to the outcome ... I think that using the wet method, but making a smaller volume, like maybe a gallon instead of 5 gallons would make it easier to mix and keep the glaze components in suspension for mixing the smaller batches of colored glaze...
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