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mnnaj

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About mnnaj

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  1. I've mostly been a lurker here. I comment occasionally and read many of the posts. I have been feeling very grateful for this community of people lately. I have found answers without asking the questions. And yes answers to questions I didn't know I had. Some of the comments are way over my head - technical glazing and electricity posts come to mind. I may not understand what you are posting, but I appreciate that each of you takes the time to share your knowledge with those of us who want to know. I am very glad to have found this group of knowledgeable, agreeable and respectful people. There are too many of you to name and I don't want to miss anyone. I know if I see a particular avatar that I should read that post. Thank you for your time and experience. I hope that you all continue to contribute for many years and that I can continue to lurk, while avidly reading the posts. Nancy
  2. I also suggest a barrier cream of some sort, I ordered mine from Walgreens, can't remember the name. There are barrier creams that act as a resist to water (useful for clay) and barrier creams for oil (working on cars or with oil paint). I used mine for a while, but couldn't remember to put it on BEFORE touching the clay. It works when it is used. Nancy
  3. We have found ourselves with quite a number of posts that have schmutz on them so they don't sit flat. Some of them have been ground down. We now have a pile of posts of various heights, just off by 1/16" , give or take, from each other. I'm toying with the idea of cutting the posts down to the next full inch to try to get them all the same size. The formerly 5" posts to 4" ect... Are there any suggestions on what kind of saw will work? I have access to an older type miter saw and a table saw. How about blades? And being kind of new to the maintenance side of kilns and shelving - is kiln wash necessary on the ends of the posts for electric kilns that only fire to ^6? Thanks, Nancy
  4. It looks like there is no glaze on the indent inside the hat. Do you have a post that is small enough not to touch the glaze that the hat could ride on during the firing? It would still need to be tall enough to get the edge of the hat off the shelf. Nancy
  5. Thank you for the notice on Warren, I live in Minnesota and didn't know he had passed. He affected many of the people I have learned from. Nancy
  6. How do they plan on keeping the loose powder from the inside of pots? Personally, I wouldn't want a pot I worked hard over to have schmutz (crap) or powder blown or dripped into it. If it won't melt on the kiln shelf, it will leave marks in my pots - the bowl or plate will not have a usable surface. Ish. Nancy
  7. Take classes. The dream of being a potter or playing with clay maybe upset by the reality of things you can't control, like back pain, allergies to dust, always having rough dry hands. Your instructor will be able to give advice on how to do things easier - things that might take you months or years to discover on your own. I also find that the interaction with other students improves me and changes my work. Seeing things online are ok, but being able see it done, walk around the demo, look at it from another angle, touch the clay at each stage, that is worth much, much more. Nancy by the way I started classes at age 50.
  8. Thank you both, I hadn't seen the thread, but it was good information. I'll relay it to her as time goes by (if she is pregnant), Nancy
  9. As a new teacher in a community education setting I have a question that I have not seen in the Forum. One of my students may be pregnant. I have looked in books on health and safety by Monona Rossol, Michael McCann, and Angela Babin. None are specific to clay, pottery and glazing. Other than the basic precautions all of us should be using (wet mopping, dust mask, frequent breaks for back), are there things/chemicals that we should be concerned about? I'm mostly thinking glazing, are there chemicals she should avoid, or will using gloves and good housekeeping be enough? Thanks for your input. Nancy Johnson
  10. Can you list the address of the show? I'm not clear on where it is. Thanks Nancy
  11. I am learning to weave. I've been quilting for 50 years, knitting & crocheting. Love the fiber arts. Nancy J
  12. Thanks for your comments. It's an urn with a cork type in the opening, I'll make sure to let who ever is filling it know to leave a hole when sealing it. Never thought of someone diving it up.
  13. A friend with a terminal illness wants an urn to eventually (soon) be sunk into a lake with some of his and his now deceased brothers ashes. I'm thinking that ashes, even in a ceramic urn, may float. Any ideas to insure that the urn will sink during the ceremony? Thanks Nancy
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