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WholeBean

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About WholeBean

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  1. Career Opportunities?

    Garecht, I graduated about 3 years ago and I found myself confronted with the same questions and problems you seem to be facing. I knew from the get go that I would probably not find a full time job in the arts. So, I decided to work whatever job I could find and try to continue playing around in clay during my free time (in the last 3 years I have been a coffee barista, shipping/receiving grunt, salesman, and electrician). In terms of keeping myself in clay, the best move I made was to arrange a work exchange at the local community college ceramics studio. I mix clay and glazes, mop the floor, fire kilns, etc. and in exchange I get to use the facility to continue making my own pots. I also made a solid effort to get involved in the local art scene. This has resulted in me regularly showing work in one of the more respected galleries in my area. I have also been able to keep a fairly steady stream of commission work coming in. However... I'm still working in construction 40 hrs a week. You asked for advice on starting out, so as a bit of a greenhorn myself, I suggest that you first and foremost find a way to keep yourself working in clay, even if it's just a few hours a week. Next, work a job to pay the bills and just keep at it. That's the message I'm getting from a number of posts by others: determination and perseverance! Best wishes! I'm in this too! -Eric PS- I find the internet is a lousy way to get results in the job market, especially in the art world. Personally, my best opportunities have come from relationships, phone calls and hand shakes.
  2. To make the cake stand in one piece does seem a bit ambitious. My suggestion would be to try and throw the plate and stand separately. However, if you are determined to make this approach work you might try making a trimming chuck that will support the outer edge of the plate. I have found this to be helpful when making a chip and dip platter (which, if you think about it, is basically an inverted cake platter).
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