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kokopelle2012

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About kokopelle2012

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 05/02/1985

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    brooklyn, ny
  • Interests
    PLANTS!
  1. Hi, I've been making terra-cotta pots for my plants. The pots i paint with mason stains, then fire. I fire to cones between 03 and 5. What i'm finding is that once these pots have been fired, many of the colors i've applied tend to rub off. I dont want to use an over glaze, its very important to me that the surface remain flat/matt free of sealants. Other times the mason stains turn to dark olive greens and browns and yellows, like rotten bruises. (this is after they've come in contact with water). Has anyone worked with this, come across these problems, or have suggestions on proper mason stain mixtures? I'm typically measuring by eye, water, pigment, some flint, some light bodied clays and some of the base clay used for the pot thats being painted. (i have an ingredients list at the studio if thats needed) i've attached 2 pictures, one is of a pot fresh out of the kiln, the other is one thats gotten wet a few times. what are your thoughts!!!??? -isaac
  2. Im working with terra-cotta (cone 04) for hand built plant pots. I'm interested in a creating a wide range of colors to add to their surfaces before firing. I have been firing once (no bisque firing) and using a white slip i created through help from this site (although the original post i've lost) and am very happy with the results. The mixture i've used is 25% Kaolin/EPK, 25% Ball/OM4, 25% Custer Feldspar and 25% Flint. So that's good, i have terra-cotta pots with white decorations that after firing remain matt, and porous, exactly as i'd imagined. Now i'm interested in expanding my surface treatments from just white, to include a wide variety of colors. I previously experimented with a black slip, (terra cotta body, water, iron oxide) but found it wasn't stead fast after the firing. I know there are mason stains on the market and engobes neither of which i'm formiliar with. My thoughts were, If i could understand what the four agents in the white slip where and how they functioned, i could set up my own mixing lab and understanding the characteristics of each element, create the slips i'm looking for. That means from my understanding, i will need a low firing (cone 04) white bodied clay to form the base for my colored slips. Then i will need the coloring agent, (this part i need help on) and then whatever else it takes to make the slip stable and suitable for my purposes. After researching the four ingredients of the first white slip this is what i've found: Kaolin/EPK= mined in florida, a white bodied clay, good for casting not for throwing. Ball/OM4= (Old Mine #4, Mayfield, KY) A fine-grained ball clay* with excellent plasticity and strength. *a clay noted for its plasticity. used for the manufacture of clay pipes allowing for thinner ceramic walls. Custer Feldspar= Im unclear on what this stuff is or does. it seems to be a type of potash. It seems to come from the mountains of north dakota. Flint= It looks like flint when ground to a fine powder is used as a filler. I'm comfortable with my understanding of colors having studied painting and color theory while in school. If i could establish a few variants (for mixing purposes) of the primary colors (red, yellow, blue) then i could probably figure the rest out (saturation, hue, tint etc) on my own. In a nut shell, i'm looking for the basic principles of colored slip making from which i can begin my experiment, which i will be happy to photograph and share with anyone interested. thank you, Isaac
  3. porous mat white slip/glaze?

    I bought these things then realized I didn't ask, are they in ratio by weight or by volume?
  4. porous mat white slip/glaze?

    you are all amazing! Such quick and knowledgeable replies! I will try these three suggestions in order of what i can get my hands on first. Thank you!
  5. I am working with Terracotta, making plant pots, and have a black iron oxide i've worked into a slip for creating black decoration on the unfired pots. i would like to do the same with white. My concern is that using a glaze essentially seals the clay, where what i'm hoping to do is color the clay without sealing it. Does anyone know of techniques or products for this? What i found that i thought might work was a white mason stain mixed with a light body clay slip? any advice is appreciated. -isaac
  6. I am working with Terracotta, making plant pots, and have a black iron oxide i've worked into a slip for creating black decoration on the unfired pots. i would like to do the same with white. My concern is that using a glaze essentially seals the clay, where what i'm hoping to do is color the clay without sealing it. Does anyone know techniques or products for this? What i found that i thought might work was a white mason stain mixed with a light body clay slip? any advice is appreciated. -isaac
  7. pots like the greeks!

    Hi Marcia, Thanks for the information and book referral. I ordered that book just now and look forward to seeing it for myself. It sounds like the Greeks might be a little more sophisticated than I intend to be. If I want really rudimentary looking pots, with simple flat black adornment, what would you suggest? I would love for the firing process to leave a mark, but maybe to complex? What do you know about the firing techniques of the ancient peruvians?
  8. pots like the greeks!

    Hi. I am new to ceramics, i've thrown for maybe 4 months, and had some of my pots fired for me at the studio i work in. Now with a mounting collection of pots, i'm interested in figuring out the rest of this process. The pots are all small, 3"-8" diameter, 3"-8" tall (1/8'-1/4" thick), so standard window sill dwelling house plant size. My idea is, decorate the pots with a flat black glaze and fire in the most primitive way available in order to maximize the earthiness of the pots without over doing it. I tried to heat some over my wood stove, then put into my wood stove, but although the smoke and heat made for some nice looks, the two pots cracked. The pots that were fired at the studio i'd been using came out harder and shiny-er then what i'm used to seeing terracotta look like. I do not know what cone they were fired too but i'm assuming it was a high cone and that caused the higher luster. My questions: For matt black drawings on otherwise unglazed terracotta (think Greek urn) what are my glaze options? For a more primitive firing technique, such as pit firing, what should i know? Are there different temperatures for different terracotta's from different suppliers? Can i glaze then fire without a bisk firing? If i was to buy a used kiln, what tempeture would it need to go too? In a nut shell, if i was an ancient greek potter, what would my studio look like, from glaze to kiln? thank you!! -isaac
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