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Venicemud

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Everything posted by Venicemud

  1. Venting Systems

    Thanks Ron, Neil and Joseph lotsa good ideas. I am not really handy or spry (will be 80 in a month) but I crawled under the kiln today, disconnected things and, using the perturbation method, got the motor working again. I recently bought new ducting so now its the collection box that has to be replaced - any more perturbation of that and it will be a pile of rust. Joseph your message indicated that you can buy the box separately from the rest of the system, I guess the next step is to get in touch with L&L and see if they'll sell me one. Thanks everyone for all the help, Joan.
  2. Venting Systems

    Thanks Ron but I must not have been very clear. The collecting box is a disintegrating entity and the motorized fan does not work at all. Joan
  3. Venting Systems

    I would like to reopen this topic. I have a ten year old L&L JD230 and the venting system (L&L Sure Vent) is shot - from the collecting box immediately under the kiln to the motor. I am considering either replacing the system with another Sure Vent or switching to a Skutt Envirovent 2. Any advice? any experience with the Envirovent 2? Any other system to recommend? One factor that is important to me is ease of replacement. Thanks for any input, Joan
  4. Your pots from your first firing are amazing - and then they get even better. My favorite is the mug on the right in the top row of your new work. It has a relaxed, carefree air while the one to the left is more stern and serious, keeping an eye on that young punk to the right who doesn't know how dangerous the world can be - made me laugh. Congratulations.
  5. I forgot to mention that my friend did not transfer the photographs to the bowls and plates but developed simple line drawings from the photos and used these as the basis for his china painting. Thus, art by local artist.
  6. If your wife opts for china painting she does not have to stop at tiles. I have a friend who bought assorted white plates and bowls, took photographs of local beach scenes - pier, lifeguard station, passing bicycle riders and used these images to decorate the recycled ware. They sold very well at a gift shop located on the pier - as art by local artist. He quite enjoyed the project.
  7. Troubleshooting Pacifica Wheel

    Anatoosh if your wheel is new the dealer should really be expected to help you solve the problem. But, if you can't get help from them call Laguna (800 452-4862) and if possible speak to Sergio at Extension 207. When one of the belts on my Pacifica broke I was advised to replace all 4, I talked to Sergio who was a tremendous help. A wonderful old guy (almost as old as me) who assured me that I could certainly replace them myself and when I drove to Laguna (Califormia) to pick up the replacement belts he had even set up a little demo in the warehouse, showing me how to do it - from removing the remaining old belts to replacing with the new ones. I hope Laguna realizes what a treasure Sergio is he really knows his business and would, I'm sure, diagnose your problem and tell you how to fix it.
  8. Raised Enamel

    China painters use a compound called raised enamel to create texture on glazed surfaces. This is then fired(post glazing) to a very low temperature - around cone 018 or slightly higher. It can be colored with China Paint stains to give colored texture. Does anyone out there have a recipe for this compound? It is commercially available but usually comes in very small quantities which makes experimentation on large surfaces a bit extravagant.
  9. Pugaboo's article looks like the one I was thinking of - but what guage wire? Can hardly wait to get started for replying, thanks, Joan. /
  10. I recently read a description of a bead tree that someone made to fire their glazed beads and pendants. However, I forget where and roaming around online has not turned up anything. My major questions are a) what guage nichrome wire to use, and where to buy the wire? I can pretty well recall the other pertinent parts so I would really appreciate your help with the other two factors. Thanks for being there and have a lovely Thanksgiving day, Joan.
  11. Making Agateware Using Glazing

    There are also ways to get a multicolored look on top of a higher fired glaze surface using china paints. One project we did in my china painting class was to create a surface that looked like malachite. Since china paints are transparent a very interesting surface can be reached with multiple firings using different colored paints. The problem with china paints on functional ware is that the paints do contain some lead and so might not be acceptable on surfaces that come into contact with food.
  12. Community Challenge #3 - The Results

    Yes, thanks Joel for the challenge idea and the energy to keep it moving. Each challenge I vow to myself to make something to enter - but chicken out in the end. Those who participate come up with such beautiful projects I'm abashed. But it sure is fun looking at the great pieces braver souls offer to the rest of us.
  13. Porcelain Pigment And Pine Oil - Help!

    For advice on china/porcelain painting, guidance to suppliers etc you might try contacting Marci Blattenberger at rxguitar@Comcast.net. She manages an online forum ppio.com which can also be very helpful.
  14. Use Of Slip Verses Under Glaze

    I have used both homemade colored slips and Amaco Velvet underglazes in the Lana Wilson manner successfully. I believe that Lana Wilson does the same in the video you mentioned. Some underglazes are certainly opaque, probably not all.
  15. Adding Color To Glaze

    You inspired me to go back and look at the article by Deanna Ranlett, I couldn't remember whether I included the zircopax and tin oxide when trying out different stains. The answer is yes, Ms Ranlett speculated that the addition of these opacifiers helped the color "float" and that without them the results were not nearly so satisfying. Did you omit or include these in your tests?
  16. Good Rubber Stamps

    I want to see your circling shark stamp, very appealing I can think of a lot of suitable recipients.
  17. Adding Color To Glaze

    I have made up a few test batches of this glaze, it can give very nice results but when thin it does give you a dark look. Also you are using a red clay that can be contributing to the darker appearance. Too thin a coat definitely tilts towards the dark side and you may have to try out higher percentages of the stains. One I made up with a Zinc Vanadium Blue required 15% stain. By the way, dark or not I think some of your results are very nice looking.
  18. Does anyone have any handy hints for improving my monoprinting adventures? I have spent a couple of days painting sumi e-like images onto newsprint and then attempting to transfer the images onto clay slabs. So far all of my clay slabs have been coated with a thin coat of white slip, the images were painted onto newsprint using Amaco Velvet black underglaze, and then this covered with a couple of coats of the same white slip. None of my attempts have been super successful, all have required extensive touch ups of the clay slab images. Perhaps the least successful was when I allowed the underglaze painted images to dry overnight before I proceeded to covering with slip and attempting the transfer. It seemed like the underglaze had bonded quite firmly to the newsprint and didn't want to leave. Any suggestions - different paper for the initial image painting, different drying stages for slip on paper or clay slab etc? I'd love to see some of your results if you have tried this technique. Joan Klotz.
  19. Monoprinting Onto Clay

    Thanks Nancy, that looks like just the DVD I need. The video clip I watched previously was different - now I'm back to my decision to order the DVD. Mitch Lyons has such a nice no-stress voice doesn't he? convinces one to relax and just do it! I have had better success in my efforts, transferring the underglaze image quite quickly while everything is still quite moist, tho not shiny. I did not remoisten the soft leather hard slab since it seemed counter intuitive, transfer from paper to clay slab not vice versa being the aim. Next, I'll try to master the intricacies of sending photo images so that you can see my progress after all this good advice.
  20. I agree with Rex, the B Mix with grog will give you an easier start if you're fairly new at throwing. Not only is it easier to throw but adding pieces, such has handles, comes more easily and successfully. On the other hand if you love the look of porcelain work, and plan to use porcelain as you gain experience, then the straight B mix might be a better training clay - and much cheaper than porcelain while you are getting the bugs worked out. I have never used Little Loafers so can't make any comparisons there.
  21. Coyote Shino Glaze Recipe

    I agree with Joseph, I think it would be pretty difficult to get that recipe. The Coyote line of shinos are really great, never seem to craze, don't run and they come in a nice variety of colors, They must be their best selling glazes.
  22. Monoprinting Onto Clay

    Sorry, but perhaps I wasn't clear about my aims. What I'm trying to do is transfer an image from paper to a clay slab so that the slab can be used to form a pot. What Mitch Lyons is doing, re the Youtube clip that I watched, is transfer an image from a clay slab to paper - a very interesting image but not what I wanted. Judith B. asked why I brush white slip onto both the clay and the paper, first because that's how Jason Bige Burnett does it and I'm obedient (sometimes), also I am using a brown clay and the use of slip on both recipient clay surface and donor paper surface offers to increase the probability of not getting brown bleed through. That might actually make for a more lively background effect, something to explore later. Thanks for all your input fellow potters.
  23. Monoprinting Onto Clay

    Thanks for all the suggestions, lots to ponder. I have the Jason Bige Burnett DVD that Min mentioned - its a two disc set with the first one being primarily devoted to screen printing. The second disc has some useful hints for the transfer process - which I happily absorbed last night. For the screen printing he mixes the Amaco Velvet underglazes with a Speedball transparent base. This I assumed was to enhance the screen printing process but perhaps it might also contribute to the transfer to clay process. The background slip that he uses (and gives the recipe for) is also somewhat different than the one I use. Grasping at straws I'm going to make up a small batch of the Burnett slip and do a comparison run after sending off this missive. Also, I will order the Mitch Lyons DVD, the one I have doesn't address this current problem but has some fun ideas for handbuilding with use of dowels of gradually increasing sizes - have to get the monoprinting one to further my education. Reading up on Paul Scott's Blues, Paints and Paintings, recommended by Sallyd, will also be part of that continuing education. Hi Marcia, its always good to hear from you, I'll definitely look up CAD printing techniques.
  24. Yellow Ochre

    Is there a difference between yellow ochre and yellow iron oxide? I want to make up a test batch of Hannah's Fake Ash glaze but it calls for yellow ochre which I don't have in my pantry and which Laguna does not have in its online catalogue. They do have yellow iron oxide listed however. Thanks, Joan Klotz (Venicemud)
  25. Which Slug Do You Like Best?

    I like the raku slug, looks much cuddlier, Venicemud
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