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  2. neilestrick

    What's Your Work Music?

    I listen to a wide variety of music while working at the wheel. Lately it's been a lot of First Aid Kit. But when I just need to crank out a bunch of pots for an hour, nothing beats Paul Simon's Graceland. It's old school, and it's the prefect energy level for throwing.
  3. Filled an Amaco wedging table years in the past, 3 inch side board with double wire cutters mounted to side and center posts. Lasted for 20 years when we refilled it. posts were the only area where plaster cracked as they got knocked from student abuse. I would say 3" is nominal with a good base. best, Pres
  4. I've always hated that name 'clotted cream'. I don't want to eat anything that's clotted. Sour cream, however, sounds delicious! Go figure.
  5. I'm new to this forum and ceramics. I'm currently building a totem. All of my pieces have impressions in them through use of found objects, stamps or carving. I'm using underglazes and glazes to bring out the texture in each piece, in part through a staining process. This is where I become confused. I'm in an open studio (low-fire only) with a busy instructor who isn't always available. I tend to get instruction on the run which doesn't seem to be working for me. I'm hoping the good folks on this forum can help me fill in the gaps. In my small glaze inventory, I have Duncan Envision Glazes and Duncan Concepts underglazes. Through test tiles on my Duncan Concepts, I've learned that they really do not behave as true underglazes and have a glossy appearance after firing (on greenware). I have a few jars of Mayco fundamentals underglaze which delivered the expected results...a collection I need to add to. My glazing/staining for texture question is which of these two methods should I use? Keeping in mind that by underglaze, I mean the Duncan concepts "underglaze" (which is all I have at the moment). I'm also working on bisqueware. 1. Using glaze (colored, glossy) should I apply it so that it falls into the recessed areas. Then, sponge off with a clean sponge. Then, apply an underglaze over the entire thing and leave on. Or........ 2. Using Duncan concepts underglaze should I apply it so that it falls into the recessed areas. Then, sponge off with a clean sponge. Then, apply glaze (colored, glossy) over the entire thing and leave on. With either method, should I be diluting either the glaze or "underglaze." Of course, I'm open to other methods.....keeping in mind that I'm a newbie. : P.S. I've already put Duncan Envisions (1037) glaze on this piece (below) and have sponged off. I had planned to add Duncan Concepts 512 green apple, but I'm not confident about the end results. Thank so much for your help!
  6. neilestrick

    glazes or underglaze ?

    I think it's glaze, probably a chrome-tin pink. All of the pink plates could be the same glaze, applied in different thicknesses.
  7. neilestrick

    Engobe for decorative use on bisque

    This would be a great place to use commercial underglazes. They're cheap, work very well, and are easy to use. Just paint them on and cover with a clear glaze. If you plan to make your own engobes, then I would definitely add some CMC Gum to the mix, to help with brushing and as a hardener that will keep them from smearing when applying the clear glaze over them.
  8. Today
  9. If this is paint, add calcium carbonate (whiting) and use a UV whitener additive to take off the yellow edge. Glaze—zirconia products? for a whitener, they’re pretty cheap. But as Neil says, glaze is cheap.
  10. karenkstudio

    Humidity and Raku Results?

    Johnny, My system for raku firing is the same each time. Can and materials are the same each time for reduction. I've used this system 50+ times, of course with varying results when using the copper glaze, and plan to check humidity % during summer months when firing. I enjoy Raku because of the many surprises the process creates. If I don't like the results I just reglaze.
  11. Magnolia Mud Research

    What should i mix in tio2 for cost reduction?

    A Whitewash Story: Once upon a time when working with a very dark clay body I needed to write on the pieces with black ceramic ink. To increase the contrast between the inked text and the background a white ink was concocted from a mixture of pure titanium oxide, a very small amount of EPK, and a pinch of soda ash, all mixed into a water slurry to a consistency between whole milk and buttermilk. The white ink was used on both green ware and bisque ware. When fired to cone 10 (reduction) the matte 'white rectangle' with black ink text was crisp, fully adhered to the surface as though it were a matte glaze. At another time (years later) a quickie white ink was made with pure titanium oxide, water, and liquid hand soap to write on the bottoms of extra dark clay bisque ware. The ink was fused to the ware and the text was a matte white; fired cone 10 reduction. I still occasionally use from the small jar of white ink. The recipe, as I remember, was two-three teaspoons of pure Titanium oxide, less than 1/4th teaspoon each of EPK and soda ash, and water. My reasoning was to use the EPK as a suspending agent and the soda ash and or soap was to lower the surface tensions and improve the wetting of the solid particles when mixed with water. These ingredients were chosen because they were readily available in the storage room at the time the ink was needed to finish time critical projects, i.e., the white ink was an improvisation under time constraints. Pure Titanium oxide is very white, reasonably refractory, and readily available (there was a big jar sitting on the bench). LT
  12. Linda A

    How much propane will I use

    Great. Thanks
  13. High Bridge Pottery

    How much propane will I use

    3-6 firings a tank seems a good ball park figure. Somewhere there ish
  14. High Bridge Pottery

    DIY Refractory on Pyrometer Thermocouple?

    How and when is it stalling exactly? Could be the thermocouple could be the kiln. If it is hitting the right temperature when the cone bends then it doesn't sound too bad or off.
  15. Liz Hamann

    Engobe for decorative use on bisque

    Also, is it better to apply the clear glaze first, then the engobe design, or design then clear? Just wondering about smearing of the design ... Thanks
  16. Liz Hamann

    Most used sieve size?

    Thanks!
  17. Dick White

    Most used sieve size?

    I have a 30 mesh sieve that I use occasionally for really lumpy glazes, or to resieve a hardpanned glaze. It breaks up the clumps and everything passes through quickly in far less time than I would need to scrape it directly through the 80 mesh screen.
  18. Liz Hamann

    Engobe for decorative use on bisque

    Is the consistency of the engobe like slip or more like a glaze?
  19. Liz Hamann

    Cone 6 Porcelain Elaine's crystal

    Thank you for mentioning the drying. I will be careful. Liz
  20. Min

    Cone 6 Porcelain Elaine's crystal

    That part did seem counterintuitive didn't it... not sure I would go that far.
  21. Min

    Most used sieve size?

    100 mesh takes far longer to screen glazes with. I've got 80 and 100 size, rarely use the 100, just use it if I'm making underglaze or engobes with stain. For glazes I don't think screening through the 100 makes any noticeable difference to using an 80.
  22. Would you post the link to this chat group? Thanks, Liz
  23. Dick White

    Engobe for decorative use on bisque

    Yes, clear glaze over colored engobes, slips, and underglaze patterns is quite common. Whether it will be smooth in the end is a function of the smothness of the application of the engobe.
  24. I'd like to decorate the base underside of large bowls by using colorful a engobe design. Could I put a clear glaze over the engobe decoration so the surface is smooth? Thanks, Liz
  25. Liz Hamann

    Most used sieve size?

    Is there be a difference in results between using 80 or 100 mesh? I have both and mostly use 100. Liz
  26. Liz Hamann

    Cone 6 Porcelain Elaine's crystal

    Thank you, Neil, for the information. I will try your suggestions... Liz
  27. Liz Hamann

    Cone 6 Porcelain Elaine's crystal

    Thank you. Yes, this is a Coleman clay. I watched the video. Never tried to put a handle on as shown, but I will. Let you know what happens. I hope the information about drying without plastic works ... Liz
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