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  2. Teala62

    NEW SKUTT WHEEL

    Hello Clay Lover, Do you have the ssx pedal or the normal one? How deep is the pan in the center where the shaft for the wheel head is ? I worry about spilling everywhere.
  3. Magnolia Mud Research

    Clay processing

    The answer to you question resides in the characteristics of what remains on the screen after completing step 4. If the "lumps" being retained on the screen seem to be stuff that belongs in the final moist clay, crushing them dry MIGHT, but not necessarily will, be the right thing to do. You can also crush these wet lumps and add the slurry back to the main batch. Crushing dry clay is dusty, and requires equipment to do so. I gather clay from my pond bottoms when they dry out. Crushing is only done to facilitate storage. However, small particles blunge more easily than big lumps. Its a tradeoff. I concur with Mark's remarks. LT
  4. Mullins Pottery

    Clay processing

    Thanks for the reply Mark. I'm basically just trying to cover all my bases. I hadn't considered the possibility of re-hydrating organics. Thankfully I haven't found any in the clay that I've worked with so far. This clay has been pretty awesome. Great to throw with or handbuild. It dries very nicely for durable workable greenware and fires beautifully at cone 04. I just haven't seen much being said about processing this way and am wanting to avoid any possible pitfalls.
  5. Min

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    From a post on reddit someone is having success using a mix of black underglaze, CMC gum and thickened linseed oil. They could do about 6 screens before the screen started clogging up.
  6. Mark C.

    Clay processing

    Just as long as you do mind mind dealing with impurities in the wet stage.You may be getting a few organics that hydrate in the wet stage and pass thru the screen. The bottom line is -is the clay turning out ok for your end use???
  7. Mullins Pottery

    Clay processing

    Hello all, As is happens I live in a desert. All the local earthenware clay I dig up is already dry and mostly free of impurities. Much of the research I've done regarding the processing of clay suggests that after drying the clay one should break up the dry bits into pieces then screen dry then re-hydrate to appropriate consistency. In my process I basically use the blunging process instead of dry screening. Aside from the drying process taking a couple days I cant think of anything that makes this process less viable. I've found this to be quite effective in weeding out the impurities. I'm wondering if there's anything wrong with doing a wet screening as opposed to a dry screening. Any thoughts? My process is this: 1. Dig up clay 2. Re-hydrate clay 3. Blunge into slurry 4. Pour through screen mesh twice 5. Dry to appropriate consistency on drying table 6. Wedge into logs 8. Bag & age
  8. Magnolia Mud Research

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    I think your question is: What material can be screen printed on to ceramic tiles, will produce crisp lines, repel a water based glaze slurry applied by hand, and burnout during the firing. Does this "resist" material have to carry a black stain as shown in the photograph? I too have very little experience with screen printing. However: I have used white school glue as glaze resist. It does require a few minutes for the bead to dry. The industrial version of the same material is often thicker (higher viscosity). If the resist must carry a black stain, the addition of the stain material will increase the viscosity of the glue; the increase might enough to work just like screen printing ink. Since I have never tried mixing stain into the glue, I do not know if the glue will interfere with the "staining" function of the stain during or after the burnout. Most of the time, school grade glue will washout from cotton and polyester fabrics with water soaking and detergent; I expect that the glue would also washout from the printing screen. I wash out my glue brushes without any problem with warm water and detergent/soap - usually 10-15 minutes after using the brushes. LT
  9. Magnolia Mud Research

    terra sig vs. slip

    I use OM-4 terra sig on the bottoms of stoneware "pots" as a means to keeping the bottom smooth to prevent damage to the surfaces that supports the "pots" in use or in storage -- such as a vase sitting on the piano. The color of the bottoms with terra sig may be different than the raw clay body. If you are routinely using the same clay body, you can mitigate the color mismatch by making the terra sig from the clay body instead of from dry clay; the yield will be lower but the color match will be closer. A colleague use to use Redart terra sig over white stoneware instead of black underglaze for sgraffito decorations. The main differences between terra sig and slip are average particle size and solids to water ratio of the slurry. Application thickness is a variable that can become important; I have encountered peeling of the terra sig coating during the final firing when the application was too thick on cone 10 stoneware. For my work it was not a significant issues as the flasks were actually enhanced by the "ancient" appearance the flaking produced. I suspect that the peeling could have been overcome by applying the terra sig at the leather hard stage rather than at the bone dry stage. Slip and terra sig are analogs to buttermilk and skimmed milk. They do not look or taste alike but both are solids suspended in an water. Milk has always been a beverage, but some folks have made a living using milk for painting chairs and kitchen tables and cupboards. By the same analogy, you can find non-traditional uses and application techniques for terra sig and slips. I have used Redart (and also local clay) slips and terra sig on white and buff stoneware to produce contrasts; Redart terra sig over (and under) glazes to make contrasting marks on/in the glaze. Robin Hopper often recommended the "try it and see" approach. I am fond of (from the way back) Alka-Seltzer commercial's approach to many of the studio ceramic puzzles: "Try it; you'll like it! ...". As Edison said: “Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless.” Pay attention to what does happen, and then think about how to use that "happening" effectively in producing your product. LT
  10. glazenerd

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    Logan: i do not use resist in any of my work, so I cannot offer you any advice. I only know about soy wax resist because a friend use to work in a silk screen/ printing shop. Here is a link, I am sure there any many outlets for it. https://www.quiltingcompany.com/store/surface-design-with-silk-screens-soy-wax-resist-and-fabric-manipulation-with-ginny-eckley-video-download?utm_source=googleshop&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=channeladvisor&CAWELAID=120344480000014199
  11. Mark C.

    Measuring pot bottoms

    If you trim a lot eventually you can feel the thickness without any thing but your fingers. I pick up a bowl that needs trimming and feel it then trim it.After doing this for years it only takes once but while you are learning you may have to handle it several times.
  12. Logan E

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    Glazenerd, if you suggest this is what I need, do you know the recipe/ingredients?
  13. glazenerd

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    Babs- soy wax resist
  14. Logan E

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    Unfortunately the premix wax resists are not what I need. They have too much wax as it will ruin the screen and not thick enough
  15. Lately when I have been looking at pots online, i notice a lot of people using terra sig. instead of slip. not the traditional use of terra sig., but using it like a slip. they are mixing mason stains and getting bright colours with terra sig, not for clay inlay. i have to wait for school to start in two months time before i can test the difference. wondering if any of you have experimented with terra sig to cover a darker clay body or even just to add colour. i am curious why someone would choose terra sig. since its so much work to make. as compared to slip.
  16. preeta

    Measuring pot bottoms

    gosh i wouldnt succeed if i didnt use the needle tool while trimming. i just use a little slip to fill in the hole. and while burning with a rib it closes the hole. i am ever grateful to the needle tool. it really helped me understand how thick my sides were. it taught my fingers to feel. i dont use it so much now. i used johnny's method to figure out the bottom.
  17. Babs

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    liquid wax resist can be washed out. Available from pottery suppliers
  18. this is an interesting conversation here. one of the things i am discovering as my 15 shares her world history thoughts with me is that there is no 'one' society. As we talked about suffragette i suddenly realized that is the history of one part of society, not all of it. that privilege for some others still had to wait 50 years. yes one part of society is valued by money. but that makes sense doesnt it? when we have such an elitist society. perhaps if we had more of an egalitarian society money wouldnt be such a big thing. i think the world is full of non Robert Fourners, but there are always a few Robert Fourner's who do question and survive. while maybe the majority values dont match the minority value, but there are people who ARE choosing family over a better paying job. the minority does have a voice and it does exist. bottom line is we have to choose which way to go. what we want to do. there is still a choice. its these teenagers who have helped me see that. they are not falling into the buy in. even though they realize they are biased by the ads they are struggling and suffering to be true to their own beliefs. i mean today we still have handmade embroidery. we really shouldnt have since the sewing machine came out over 200 years ago.
  19. Babs

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    ok there are a couple of products around in the screen printing world. one is a permanent resist one is water soluble. The water soluble does last a number of uses...Been years since I used these products but any screen printing suppliers would have them.. I found on textiles the break down process of resist actually was v. attractive. an aside here. also it isnt/ wasn't hugely expensive to get your screens made up by some commercial screenprinting places.. Just a thought. product names not coming to the brain. Can iron out was resist though...protect the lungs.
  20. Babs

    cadmium red

    yes, I slide the glaze ingredients into bucket already partially filled with known quantity of water.if bentonite is going in it is mixed with another ingredient prior to adding. Left to slake then sieved next day ideally.
  21. Logan E

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    I am applying the resist on the screen, to lay the linework on the bisque tiles.
  22. Babs

    Help! Cuerda Seca "dry line"

    you're creating the resist on the clay or on the screen?
  23. Babs

    Reglaze tips needed!

    Interesting you say that Callie as I, no experience doing the following, thought I'd read you had to be super careful re stuff from fingers when applying litres and china paint. I haven' worried personally when spot glazing blemishes ware as I always thinkbbqing is a bonus if it works well anyway..
  24. Gabby

    NEED HELP?

    This same question was asked very recently. Maybe someone who uses the search function better than I do can steer you right to that thread.
  25. yappystudent

    NEED HELP?

    I have a growing collection of mosaic shards, glues, backings, and concept drawings, also a couple probably overly-zealous prototypes. As I rethink the saying 'keep it simple, Stupid', I continue to collect the better-looking pot shards and other materials until I'm ready to tackle the project again.
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