Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Today
  3. I use mostly rags. I have rags for glazing, rags for throwing, Sometime paper towels, but not often. In the summer (warmer weather) I will soak the towels, rinse them outside and once they are clean, put them in the washer. But usually I just take those rags to the local laundry. That's what the laundry is there for!!
  4. neilestrick

    Engobe Questions

    The reason we don't use cone 4-10 bodies here is because most cone 10 bodies will weep at cones 4-6. To say that your method has worked for you doesn't negate that fact. Search the forums here, we have people posting about weeping almost weekly. If it works for you, then great, keep at it. No one is telling you that it doesn't work for you. We're simply saying that it's not the best practice for people in general. I take offense at the assertion that maybe 'we don't want the hassle of thinking, and want everything laid out for us just so'. Let's leave personal attacks out of this.
  5. Roberta12

    Why make functional ware?

    The function of ceramic products drew me in immediately. Not only could I "design" (not much designing in the beginning) the ware, execute the making, take it to completion, I could USE it!!! I had friends over for lunch last week. Salad lunch. My favorite salad plates are the first ones I made. They are large, clunky, but almost like a pasta bowl, so they are great for salads. We had cheese, crackers, wine, just a lovely day. As they were leaving, one friend asked if I would make her more espresso cups, and I asked about what clay, glaze, etc. She said, "I really don't want things to match. I like it when everything is different and unique. I loved the look of your table today with the plates, the different cups for wine, the platter for the cheese and crackers. That is what I like!" Yes, she is the subculture that gets it. She gave me the highest compliment possible. I was humbled. Roberta
  6. Magnolia Mud Research

    Plasticity ! How to Measure ?!

    Perhaps this blog post will help your understanding of plasticity measurement techniques: https://blog.biokeram.com/methods-for-plasticity-measurement-of-a-ceramic-material LT
  7. I learned the habit of first getting most of the clay off my hands in a water bucket. I then use hand towels. For surfaces I use big sponges.
  8. I use terry cloth towels. Mostly hand towels while throwing. I wash my hands in the throwing water bucket, dry off with a throwing towel. Then finish washing my hands in the sink, drying off on a “clean” towel next to the sink. When glazing, I wrap a bath towel around my waist. Because like @LeeU I cannot resist wiping my hands on my pants. Glazing seems to require much more hand wiping than anything else. When pulling handles, I wear a terry cloth wrist band to stop water dripping down to my elbow. I tried @Callie Beller Diesel‘s method but it didn’t help. For me, the water doesn’t drip down my arm during the pulling phase. It drips during the phase when I shape the handle and attach the bottom end. Because for that move I hold the mug up at eye level > arms now angled upward > water runs down arm rather than off the hands into bucket. All of my studio towels and wristbands get taken down to a neighborhood laundromat, rather than my home laundry machines. It’s one of those big ones that is open 24/7. I figure their drains can handle a lot more than my house can.
  9. GEP

    Why make functional ware?

    Eva Zeisel (Hungarian-American, not German)
  10. Tyler Miller

    Plasticity ! How to Measure ?!

    This says it best in scientific terms: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169131710003601 From the abstract “Despite the advance in the theory of the plasticity and the methods of measurement, a common procedure for all types of materials does not exist. The most important methods are those that simulate the conditions of real processing.”
  11. Sputty

    Engobe Questions

    Well, not quite 04 to 10 (1060-1300 deg C, 1940-2380 deg F), but a range is usually given that is broader than that given in the US, it's true. Is that because clay manufacturers in the US assume that their customers don't want the hassle of thinking, and want everything laid out for them just so, or is it because clay manufacturers in Europe assume that their customers don't give a cuss, and recognise that there are so many other variables that one more won't matter? Dunno. Either way, I've actually noticed no practical problem with this at all, to be honest, although I do understand from a nerdy point of view that a clay has an absolute optimum point of firing. But if that point is at the crest of a bell curve, then there's a range either side that gives perfectly acceptable results, in the real world. The stoneware clay I use is given as having a range between 1180-1280 deg C (cone 4 to cone 9). I use it at cone 6, and it's tight, strong, and with less than 3% absorption as far as my primitive devices can tell. Certainly never had a problem with it, and neither have my customers. The earthenware I use is given as having a range between 970-1050 deg C (cone 107 - cone 04). Same story as above, minus the absorption bit. Now, you could argue that there is a precise point in the given ranges of those two clays that gives an optimum - what? Strength? Whatever, it's not as important as is made out, in my opinion, in a purely practical sense. Somewhere in the middle will do, and will be absolutely fine for 99% of uses. I think what becomes 'common acceptance' is whatever works well for a given purpose.
  12. glazenerd

    Engobe Questions

    Sputty: I have wondered for years why it was common practice in Europe to assign Cone 04 to 10 firing range on clay bodies: now I understand. Common practice becomes common acceptance.
  13. Babs

    Why make functional ware?

    There Are left hand mugs. Fir a while folk were making sculpted mugs...on side which normally ,ha, written by a leftie, would face away from drinker. Try navigating past a dragon, buffalo on way to placing mouth to mug...
  14. Babs

    Why make functional ware?

    Then there amazing ceramist who "design " vessels which are then made by industry..some of them are mighty fine to use. But too expensive for me..old her german lady comes to mind but not her name. Now why was the tile maker making tiles??? Perfectly fine range of industrially produced stuff. I dead pan..sorry I'm a bit deaf would you repeat that...and if they do..I smile upon them.
  15. Sputty

    Engobe Questions

    That may be true, although I could argue endlessly about the sharpness of the dividing line. How is it relevant to using an engobe? Or are you referring to my lead glaze aside? No, it didn't. Sorry. I must be a bit dense today, which would not be unusual. Whilst I genuinely appreciate your technical take on things, I also appreciate an empirical approach that builds a corpus of enduring knowledge for everyday work. Some people, when they make bread, obsess and fuss endlessly about hydration levels to the nearest tenth of a percent (I exaggerate, but only slightly), the relative importance and ratios of gliadin and glutenin, and so on. Others just go ahead and make perfect bread, regardless. Both camps are interesting, and justified in their viewpoints, but neither has an exclusive claim to the high ground (and I doubt you'd try to stake that anyway). Most of us sit somewhere in the middle, I suspect, and just want to make some pots (or bread) before we die. Back to @Polydeuces original post - Gimme stuff that works and cut the willy waving! ...I think is the translation. I've tried to do that, based on my own experience of what actually obtains in the real world.
  16. Sputty

    Engobe Questions

    In extremis, that is of course true. But within the limits of everyday practice, I disagree. Well, I'd suggest you tell Robin Hopper, but he's taking a long rest, so you'll get no reply. In the meantime, I'll rely on his (and to a lesser extent, my) extensive - practical - experience of using the slip across a wide range of temps. In what way 'won't it work' at some point, in any real-world situation? Bearing in mind the purpose of an engobe? Why do you class that particular slip as cone 10, rather than cone 6 (let alone cone 04, where I have used it with great success)?
  17. Is there any scientific way of measure the plasticity and tell it in numbers ? I know the easy way by rolling out a coil and wrap around the fingers to check the plasticity in no time but I wanted to know is there any way that I can measure it and keep noted so that it can be a reference is future ...
  18. I have dedicated studio towels that just get thrown in the washer. I have bath sheets that get draped over my knees while I'm throwing or doing certain finishing tasks, and some medium sized ones for general purpose hand wiping. Just got them all from the thrift store. They go into the regular wash in their own seperate load, but I wash them pretty frequently in the name of keeping the dust down and not putting a lot of clay through my top loader. I tend to clean 98% of the clay on my hands off into a bucket (also wiping with a grout sponge) that later gets decanted into my reclaim. At that point, my hands are safe enough just to wash with soap and water in the bathroom sink. When pulling handles, I pull separately and let them set up before attaching, so I'm really only having to clean up from that job once, and not constantly wiping my hands. Fun hint: you keep your elbow dry if you dip the clay slug in the water bucket instead of getting your whole hand wet. I don't buy paper towels for the rest of the house, never mind my studio.
  19. I have older cotton towels for shop use-one hangs on a hook near the door. I have a stack of clean folded ones in studio. They only get used for clay.They vary from hand to bath size.I was them in a. shop cold water only(no soap) washer-its a front loader I bought new a few years ago -I get about 10 years on machines before clay kills them.The last machine wash a hand me down from friend. The water is used as grey water on berry patch in summer from washer.In winter is piped into shop underground rainwater pipes (from hitters) that take it long away from house onto more bamboo. Towels and shop clay cloths are washed in they system removed from house laundry system.No clay in house on cloths or towels.I wash once a week during weekend cheap power. I sponge off surfaces with large sponges. I have a dedicated clay sink with facet on a pipe about 18 inch from sink bottom.Water from sing goes into a two tub settling system outside.That water is hosed via gravity feed to timber bamboo patch year around. since this is a full Time gig all this make sense. For most it makes little sense
  20. glazenerd

    Engobe Questions

    Sputty: The sharp dividing line in pottery is: functional vs. non-functional. non- functional use is much more liberal and non- restrictive. There is much more wiggle in application. Functional work narrows down the freedoms into stricter parameters. Thus the wide variance in responses. T
  21. glazenerd

    I HAVE A QUESTION, NEED HELP?

    Tile source: https://kruegerpottery.com/collections/bisque-tiles i am sure there are others.
  22. "So the pool.." aaah, got exited there for a few seconds! Hulk was a swimmer (still hittin' the pool two or three times a week) back in th'day. Ahem, I'm with you Pres; water, and cleaner water, then cloth rag/towel when dry hand is necessary. I do use the cute little round sponge, however, the Hulk size sponge gets a lot more use, for cleaning hands, wheel, tools, bats, etc., and pieces cut from Hulk size sponge (search "grout sponge") see more use on pots (thanks Bill VG for purpose cut shape idea). The towel comes in handy when something needs dry right now - typically hands or bat, most else can take its time drying up. From there, I'm pouring off the clear water and settling the clay for reclaim. The clay-y clothes, rags, apron, etc. get two soak and rinse cycles before laundry, also with you there Pres. I use paper towels to clean my bike, blot water drops off my glasses after soap and water wash, then re-use them to wipe up bird crap. That's Jack, admiring brand new wheel (last Fall). Years in the trades almost cured me o'wipin'me hands on trouser legs ...almost.
  23. LeeU

    Thoughts on Pricing

    Personally I would avoid consignment like the plague. They don't stock their stores by renting out shelf space-they pay for the products they resell as retail, and your product should be no different. Make sure it works smoothly and superbly. A pretty/handsome/interesting pipe that is a clunker for functionality won't fly. You may be interested in this (old) site- http://headyclay.com/ A simple large porcelain (not an effigy pipe) would run roughly $80. Ray used to post here about his pipes, and the business of marketing/selling them. It might be worth a search of the forums-I remember him posting about what he could and could not sell online, vs. on the ground, and various laws in different locations.
  24. preeta

    I HAVE A QUESTION, NEED HELP?

    I’ve made tiles for a ceramic mural as well as used store bought already glaze fired bathroom tiles with underglaze on them.
  1. Load more activity
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.