Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. LeeU Advanced Member Members 520 1,014 posts LocationNew Hampshire Report post (IP: 65.175.181.4) Posted 11 minutes ago I've been thinking a while about those of us who have spoken about various limitations, challenges, health impairments, disabilities, and so forth. Some folks have had to leave the Forums and reduce their work because of certain conditions of body and/or mind (tho I believe they are integrated, not two separate issues). There is no Forum particulary suited or appropriate for discussion about one's aches and pains, or serious impediments that affect our ability to work in, and enjoy working in, clay, or work-arounds that help make it easier to function and hang in there. So, my question is: Either generally or specifically, what do you think, feel, and/or do when confronted with moderate to serious/severe limitations of some aspect of health that alters how you work in clay?
  3. I fired a lot of student work, much would be considered sculptural and was thicker. Often they would be the last to be fired, before firing would set on the kiln double thickness kiln lid until the next firing, fired on the lowest level of the kiln, fired very slowly-two days to ^06, and often loaded into the kiln on shelves with grog, or short small extruded coils under them. These usually survived, I also recall using pealite in a ceramics workshop for fast firing. This insulation material was added to the wet clay and thrown or carved and then fired after sun drying for a few hours. ^06 went overnight. Some of the pieces were thicker (sculpture) and had to be fired longer, but still pretty quick. In working with something like this I would imagine the surface quality would be of concern, but it is possible to use that to advantage. best, Pres
  4. I've been thinking a while about those of us who have spoken about various limitations, challenges, health impairments, disabilities, and so forth. Some folks have had to leave the Forums and reduce their work because of certain conditions of body and/or mind (tho I believe they are integrated, not two separate issues). There is no Forum particulary suited or appropriate for discussion about one's aches and pains, or serious impediments that affect our ability to work in, and enjoy working in, clay, or work-arounds that help make it easier to function and hang in there. So, my question is: Either generally or specifically, what do you think, feel, and/or do when confronted with moderate to serious/severe limitations of some aspect of health that alters how you work in clay?
  5. Today
  6. Pres

    Wide Range firing clay bodies

    I have recopied my reply to a posting of Neil's in the Engobe Quesions. I stated in my reply that I would be splitting the topic into two topics as the engobe discussion was hijacked by a discussion of strong feelings involving the use of wide range firing clay bodies. All of you in the US know that there exist several bodies that will fire from a range of ^4-@^9 or 10, no mater what the reason the manufacturer has for making it, potters need to be certain it fits their needs. . . . only testing will tell. Years ago as and experienced, but naive potter, I used a 6-10 body from Standard Ceramics. This was a nice off white clay that took glazes well, and with spraying stains and glazes over a bristol glaze that matured at ^6 which I fired to a hard cone 6 seemed to work well. A few years went by, and I found that most of the pots I used personally started to weep, craze, and after some time glaze would lift from the piece, spalling. Surfaces had become dull also. In the end, I had been involved in other things and when got back to ceramics, I rethought the entire clay firing range, glaze fit problem. Since then post made 15 years ago are still as they came out of the kiln after heavy use, microwave, oven and dishwasher use. They do not weep, even when not glaze on the bottom of bowls and other items. The Engobe questions discussion had been subverted as will happen when opinions run strong in one direction or another. It seems that the engobes have been covered well, and presently there is little to add. Most that I see seems to be in the realm of personal agendas.Therefore, I have split the topic into two topics so as those wishing for information on Engobes may find it easily, and now there is a discussion on Wide Range firing clay bodies. Those of us interested in functional ware may have a completely different viewpoint than those of you into sculpture, but we all need to understand preference and difference. If there are positive suggestions as to topics I have split or maybe missed, deal with me direct in a PM as I would prefer not to have further chance for animosity to occur within the forum. I would also be mindful of playing games with reporting members of the moderator staff as if one is a moderator. This game was played out a while back, and we lost an excellent resource, and there are still scars among the members of the forum, and some of us have very long memories. best, once again Pres
  7. Whether as a full time, income generating, business or a satisfying low income job or part time avocation, know up front it will be expensive. I took small business classes as I earned my BFA in ceramics and was able to plan out a "how to, and how much" if I were to pursue clay work as a career. I did not go that route and only returned to it a few years ago, establising a home studio after I retired. Knowing the cost projections was very helpful--if I went in blind about the start-up and ongoing expense I would have been sorely disappointed at how long it could take for any investment to begin to pay off. With issues such as depression, or any health challenge, it is important to factor in the wear and tear, the known cycles, the possible practical limitations, and the obstacles any such condition might pose when trying to ignite enough fire to sustain interest and push through over the long term. It is easy to compare oneself to others who seem to be having an easier time of it and misjudge the reasons as having to do with talent or motivation (i.e. self-blame or lack of encouragement from others) rather than confronting the reality of the fallout from a serious health condition. I had an instructor who chastized me when I disclosed I was having health problems that were affecting my work but that the work was keeping me going. He told me "art isn't therapy" and suggested I should quit. I was almost crushed, but my nature is to scrape it off my shoe and say "Oh yeah, watch me", so I came through OK. Lesson learned, support from people who understand such dynamics is crucial for channeling my passion into a steady state that is at balance with the rest of my life. Becoming a professional potter is no different than establishing any other career--requires hard work, time, money, ability to withstand set-backs, and above all the willingness to learn the tools of the trade (the chemistry, the techniques, the history etc.) Take the best, most comprehensive courses/workshops you can find. Also check to see if there is a local or regional Potters Guild where you are and join it.
  8. Welcome to the Forums. There are plenty of people here, with near limitless information, including those, who do make a living selling their work. So, I suggest you start off, by looking through the Forum topics, as Gabby suggested. You may have questions that have already been asked and answered. Use the search bar on the top right. If you have a question, that hasn't been asked, ask away. Like I said, there is a lot of experienced, knowledgeable posters here. You've already started classes, which is great, as being hands on is the best way to learn, and figure out if something is for you or not. Keep at it, and don't get discouraged. Nobody got good at clay work over night. There will be frustration, there will be failure. But there will also be a lot of excitement, and sense of accomplishment.
  9. Benzine

    Up to what temp can I vent?

    I've always found that difficult to gauge personally. It's not that they don't feel cool, it's just that they almost always do to me.
  10. Marcia Selsor

    Up to what temp can I vent?

    he was one of the 6 ceramicists exhibited at the Whitney as a ground breaking event for ceramic art in 1980. Gilhooley, Mason, Voulkos, Price, Arneson and Shaw. I saw a show of the 6 of them at the San Jose NCECA around that time.Mason's work was powerful. They all were. I digress https://archive.org/stream/ceramicsc00fole/ceramicsc00fole_djvu.txt
  11. Marcia Selsor

    Up to what temp can I vent?

    if they are cool to your cheek they are too wet.
  12. glazenerd

    Engobe Questions

    Deuces: the better way to look at engobes is effect: what effect are you after? Engobes are used as a coating that completely mask the clay body under them. Some examples would be a porcelain engobe over a stoneware body: often used in crystalline glazes. Perhaps a porcelain over a dark bodies stoneware so glazes are clearer. Often times potters use one primary clay body, and use engobes to change things up without having to stock multiple clay bodies. engobes are used for carving; a stained engobe over porcelain: then carved through for effect. White engobe (Zircopax or titanium) over a dark stoneware: then carved. At cone 04: white earthenware over terra cotta, or vice versa, carved, layered, etc. The easiest way to use an engobe is to just mix it from your current clay. Add body stains, colorant oxides, etc. Porcelain takes stains, produces better whites than stoneware. Second option would be to select a stoneware and porcelain bodies with nearly equal COE values. EX: stoneware COE at 5.65 and porcelain at 5.75. Use one for the body and one as the engobe: buy quantities accordingly. Then you do not have to deal with recipes at all. Engobes are more about coating than anything else. once you get a few miles down the road with it: experiment! The fun stuff.if you want to do some intricate detailing that requires time. Dry the engobe clay completely, powder it down ( outside with a mask) then add 2% bentonite, blend dry, and add water slowly until you hit the creamy paste state. 2% bentonite will buy you extended carving time before it dries. if you want super white use porcelain : add up to 10% zirco. Add 2-3% feldspar to counteract the properties of the zirco. The easiest engobe is the body you are using, or using a second body in the same cone range, with a closely matching COE. Makes life much easier. t
  13. If you explore the business part of the site, you will see frequent discussion among people beginning to launch ceramics careers and those who have had successful careers for decades. I suggest you do some searching there right away, as well as in the Studio section! To help you get started searching, shawnhar has been at this only about four months. yappystudent has done pottery for several years but is only starting a career at it recently. Look at their threads. Mark C, on the other hand has been doing this 40 plus years and Marcia Selsor maybe 50 years. Min, GEP, Pres, and Callie have all been professionals for many years and give lots of guidance on the forum that you will have at your finger tips as soon as you start searching. I noticed you referred to the appeal of a "simple life. " I don't know whether having your own business necessarily is the simplest life. I don't know that needing to market and sell your wares alongside everyone else who is trying to do the same is necessarily simple for everyone. It fits some people's personalities well and some poorly. Good luck to you.
  14. Yesterday
  15. Hi... so I’m a 25 year old who has been slowly been struggling towards a college degree. Overall I’ve done poorly, largely due to struggles with depression(which I’m now receiving treatment for) but also due to lack passion/drive for what I’ve been studying. However I think I’ve found something I am passionate about: pottery/wheel ceramics. I’ve been taking weekly pottery classes at a local art center and it’s all I can think about. I spend all of my spare time reading and watching videos about ceramics. I’m also a lover of quality teas, particularly those from China and Taiwan, so my focus has been on creating Chinese/Taiwanese-inspired teawares. While I’ve been learning fairly quickly, I certainly understand that I have a lot to learn. While I’m not fully ready to commit yet, I’ve become more and more entranced with the idea of becoming a professional potter. I understand that it will take a lot of work and is generally not the most lucrative profession, but I think I’d be fine with living a simple life if I can have a career that I’m passionate about. My question is how best to start the path towards making a career out of pottery. Should I take ceramics classes at my local college? (Their only offering are ceramics I and II classes). Should I try to find an apprenticeship? About 45 minutes away there is a clay center that I’ve been to that rents studio space, should I ask around there? TLDR: I’m a young amateur ceramicist considering trying to make it into a career. Theoretically, how should I go about that?
  16. If glazing all mug are you dipping? Like a bit like finger marks as above answer suggests. Glaze thickening after multiple mugs glazed? I.e. specific gravity issue...
  17. Babs

    Engobe Questions

    Well said Pres and Neil. The poster's question can be addressed without the need to destroy another person's contribution, or push a personal agenda or petty one up manship vendetta. In ceramics testing for self or researching further the info. presented as solutions is in the poster's hands Unless there is an obvious danger to public or potter within the soln. Then a moderator steps in.
  18. Benzine

    Up to what temp can I vent?

    When I assign my sculpture project, I allow the students, to build it, using any method they'd like. It is the final project, and at that point, we've been through, pinching, coil building, slab building/ slumping. I do allow them to hand model the clay, and hollow it out, as well. However, when they ask my opinion, I'll tell them to go with slabs or coils, depending on the form they are looking to achieve. For curvy, more organic objects, I highly recommend coils. For things that are more geometric, I recommend slabs. Regardless of the building method, they know the rule that I've hammered home since the first week of class. I won't fire anything that is an inch thick or over. The thickest slats I have for making slabs are 1/2" and the extruder makes coils that are about the same. Using either slabs or coils have the benefit of knowing exactly how thick, every spot of the sculpture is. It is very difficult to hollow a sculpture out, to a consistent thickness. The issue isn't just with steam related explosions either. There can also be issues, when the chemical water is "burned" off, not to mention all the changes to structure that happen at different points of the heating and cooling process. There is a lot of stress going on there, with thick pieces. Finally, you have the problem of thick and thin(ner) spots drying, expanding/ contracting at different rates. If you have a thicker spot of your sculpture, next to a spot that is thinner, they will pull away from each other, due to how quickly the expand and contract. This will lead to some bad cracking, and other structural flaws. That actually reminds me of several years ago, the year my District hosted our Conference Art Show. One of the judges I got, was a ceramicist. We got to the Ceramic Sculpture category. There were a couple from one of the other schools, that I thought were really nice. They were large, detailed, and had great subject matter. They didn't place very well, if at all. The reason is, the judge looked at how they were made. They were built solid, and hollowed out. They survived the firings, but with some cracking. However, they were insanely heavy for something their size. The judge did not like that at all. Your sculptures look great, and I know myself and others here, just want them to turn out the best that they can, hence the advice.
  19. I bought a stack of hand sized towels and a few bath sized from the overstock store in a light mud color! they don't show stains from the red clay and they look better.
  20. Mark C.

    Pottery wheel belts

    Usually the motor has a belt tightening adjustment-find that an loosen it up and the belt can come off as you manually turn the wheel head. A photo of this wheel would help a lot.
  21. Pres

    Engobe Questions

    Years ago as and experienced, but naive potter, I used a 6-10 body from Standard Ceramics. This was a nice off white clay that took glazes well, and with spraying stains and glazes over a bristol glaze that matured at ^6 which I fired to a hard cone 6 seemed to work well. A few years went by, and I found that most of the pots I used personally started to weep, craze, and after some time glaze would lift from the piece, spalling. Surfaces had become dull also. In the end, I had been involved in other things and when got back to ceramics, I rethought the entire clay firing range, glaze fit problem. Since then post made 15 years ago are still as they came out of the kiln after heavy use, microwave, oven and dishwasher use. They do not weep, even when not glaze on the bottom of bowls and other items. This slip discussion has been subverted as some do, I would appreciate a return to the subject with emphasis on the engobe situation. It seems that the engobes have been covered well, and presently there is little to add. Most that I see seems to be in the realm of personal agendas. I will be splitting off some of these strands into a separate area on clay body firing ranges. Those of us interested in functional ware may have a completely different viewpoint than those of you into sculpture, but we all need to understand preference and difference. best, Pres
  22. About 4 plastic buckets that I rotate through the kitchen sink since I don't have a dedicated sink. They sit around for a day or so until I can pour the water off. Kitchen and "bar mop" towels from the dollar store. Big sponge for the table and a fan to dry the surface in between spongings, otherwise it would remain wet for too long. I tend to change clay colors a lot.
  23. yappystudent

    Owl process photo3.png

    Slip painting over black clay. What to title the book?
  24. yappystudent

    WIPs

    Current work in progress or recently scrapped.
  25. Sue palmer

    Pottery wheel belts

    Thanks everyone, I’ve managed to get a code off the belt, but I now have another issue. How do you get the belt off?? It looks to me like everything has been built around the wheels and belts. Completely stuck....
  26. yappystudent

    Where do you put freshly thrown pieces?

    Get a student or teacher's aide to serve as a runner? Hand off the bowl to them and they carry it to a shelf against the wall. The student at the wheel would have to mark their bowl clearly to not get it mixed up with others.
  1. Load more activity
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.