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  2. oldlady

    Glaze Cracking around Handles when Drying

    bill, i have enlarged the post you submitted but still cannot read all of the info. my eyes are very good but my brain is not as fully saturated with chemistry as yours. everything under the title Marcia's silky clear true matte is invisible no matter how much i enlarge it. could you please list the ingredients in normal type and explain that first one, i read frit 3249. can find no reference to this number. did i read it wrong or is it some unusual product that is only available in some other place? and Amtalc is also a puzzle. i assume calcined kaolin would be EPK calcined but assumptions are unsafe as we all know. i have been looking for a zinc free translucent matte glaze for years so i can use green slip under it without the final color being grey. this might be it if i can clear up the ingredient list. thank you
  3. oldlady

    Favourite craft show tools and tricks

    damp soapy rags and dry towels. that last show was messy with rain and mud and i know some of it will show up on my white shelves. carrying a damp soapy rag in a plastic zip bag makes all the difference. and dry towels are packed between pots in some of the boxes. a huge bath towel on top of the big basket of small things keeps the drive quiet. the soft weight doesn't allow movement among the little pots so i can put heavier things on top without breaking the little ones. rubber bungee cords to hold the pvc pipe/concrete tent weights firmly against the legs so they do not get in the way.
  4. Today
  5. Alex Hell

    Us To Uk Frit Substitution Chart?

    Hello Fredrin, did you gave it a try? Do the substitutions work for 3134 and 3195? Best, Alex
  6. oldlady

    Giffin grip

    today i found an additional benefit from my giffin grip. i made some bowls that i wanted to put blue slip on so i could carve patterns in them. i always use the low sliders in my grip but trying to cut close to the rim while the pot is being held by those low sliders is impossible. so, i used the wide sliders that have the rubber padding on the opposite side. i ran them all the way into the center and put my bowls over them. then slid the padded side outward gently to hold the bowls in place while i carved right down to the rim. no problems at all.
  7. Hi! I am new to the community, but so thankful for this amazing resource! I have a Duncan 1029N. It’s an over engineered manual kiln with a kiln sitter for anyone who’s not familiar. This kiln has three zones, four elements each. Only my bottom four elements are turning on during firing. If interested, I’ve attac the wiring diagram. Has anyone here replaced the 4300 fixed interval switch and 4600 repeat timer switch themselves? I have a tech I can call out to do it, but I’m wondering if it’s something I can do myself. I found the directions online (specific to Duncan) for how to do it. But when I talked to the tech about it, he definitely heavy sighed. Is it just a big pain because they’re at the bottom of the control panel? Will I need special tools? Thank you for any feedback you can offer!
  8. Yesterday someone presented me with an unexpected gift. I'd been driving a friend around for months because his car died with no hope of resurrection, he had no money/no credit, and he only just finally obtained a vehicle. It was a "thank you"--a little red box he picked up at a collectables consignment shop. It has a name in gold on the bottom left, so I looked it up. Imagine my surprise to learn it is a vintage Russian lacquered trinket box. However, reading further, I suspect mine is a product of cultural appropriation, as there is a flaw on the side where the lacquer is slightly split. In this case, I am OK with it being a knock-off, if it is, becasue it's still a cool box, the 'thanks' was nice, and I learned about some art I'd never heard of. Fedoskino Pegockuho Lacquered Jewelry Box, Russian: The Three Sisters "PEGOCKUHO" is the Russian word for "factory". The word "FEDOSKINO" is a village near Moscow, Russia and is the home of the longest standing miniature lacquer trinket box industry. The history of this artwork spans back to the 19th century and is known for its high-quality artistry and craftsmanship. These unique miniature oil paintings gained popularity and stood out with the addition of gold leaf, mother of pearl, and metallic media. Using these components helped to replicate and capture the true beauty of nature on these vintage boxes, constructed by a specialized papier-mâché process (which uses a clay primer-justifying my posting this on a ceramics board LOL/lu). With the opening of Russia in 1990, the art of Russian lacquer miniature painting has gained worldwide appreciation and these small treasures are highly sought after by collectors. As a result, many Russian boxes are now being produced by untrained people using inferior materials such as wood, poured acrylic, or pressed sawdust-board called argalite. These imitation lacquer miniatures are being sold on the streets of Russia and through venues like eBay. Many of these fakes have the name of one of the four villages and even the name of a well-known artist added to fool the uneducated buyer. (Emphasis mine/lu)
  9. Babs

    Lucy Rei Glazes?

    So I have something to look forward to:- //
  10. Bill Kielb

    Glaze Cracking around Handles when Drying

    OK, I looked at this glaze and I am not sure why you prefer it. From a chemistry aspect it has a non durable RO ratio (0.07:0.93) and has a 6:1 silica to alumina ratio which is more glossy than matte so likely not true matte. Boron for cone six melt is fairly low and from a CTE standpoint the alumina would appear low for very low expansion bodies like porcelain. Having said all that, are you open to trying another matte and customizing the matte (to personal preference) with silica addition and additional melt with boron? I am sure this glaze has some redeeming qualities but it appears to be a boat load of unnecessary to me. If you are open to a glaze change I have attached a true matte that you could possibly work with. It has a durable RO, very clear, no zinc and plays well with underglazes and low expansion bodies. It has been tested from hard matte to absolute gloss and we have a formula in the studio that we call Plus 6 for the added silica and slight softer matte / satin look along with enough boron to melt at 4-1/2, yet tolerate a cone 7 firing. This glaze does not move much if at all. I have attached your glaze in the Katz UMF spreadsheet of which I have permission to modify and share. We originally did some visual basic modifications on this sheet which he freely provided and he provided permission for us to freely distribute the modified sheet. If you like UMF, then this will be revealing. If not - please disregard. Best of luck!
  11. Mark C.

    steel nail in stoneware?

    Metal and clay expand at different rates and amounts-metal at cone 10 can melt or deform -The only way is to try it and learn. Me well I have seen metal at cone 10 ands it not pretty .I suggest doing it and seeing. Is it safe well safe for what-not safe for cooking or eating from-safe for nailing a plank up afterwards -well no the nail will not ever be the same.But on the plus side that nail may stop a vampire
  12. Mark C.

    Used fire brick changed my plans

    You will note I have two sizes of burners-on pair on each side. I fire two kilns to cone 11 almost every other week at same time Rae I can also adjust my pressure if needed with a manometer . Its 1/4# now or 7 inches water column . My meters are all smart meters meaning they signal the usage with no meter readers.
  13. liambesaw

    Lucy Rei Glazes?

    If you haven't gone arse over tea kettle into the kiln, you haven't lived!
  14. JohnnyK

    steel nail in stoneware?

    Hmmm...I recently bisque fired a couple of pretty big and solid corbels for a friend and when I opened the kiln, both the corbels were in pieces. They broke apart...did not explode...and I found a couple of pieces of 3/8" rebar embedded in them apparently for reinforcement. I'm guessing that the metal expanded to the point that the clay just broke apart around the metal. Just saying...
  15. Rae Reich

    steel nail in stoneware?

    When the Franklin Adams factory was on its last legs, we'd get pugs with chunks of (we assumed) rusting and deteriorating pug mill, some as big as 1/2". It became a contest to see if a pot could be thrown to completion around these obstacles. I got a large chunk, about 3/8" square, embedded in a 10" pot, even bellied out the wall and it remained, so I drew a design around it, glazed it and fired. The chunk melted, leaving a hole and a big drippy iron stain mid pot. Thinking the nail might melt and puddle, especially if glaze is involved.
  16. Thank you for the good information! I did speed up the firing faster than typical towards the end because I needed to shut her down and get out of the studio. That must have been it. I’ll open the kiln tomorrow and see the results. Fingers crossed it’s not overfired!!
  17. Babs

    Lucy Rei Glazes?

    Hans also did her firing, he died but Lucie lived to a very old age so clear out of your studio when firing. Wear protection when mixing glazes I once saw a doc on teev where A very old Lucy was emptying her top loader. The interviewer was doing his utmost not to lay hands on her little rump as she balanced midriff on the edge of her kiln, head and upper body out of view in it's interior. Feet dangling above stool.
  18. Thank you! I did fire faster than usual. That must have been it.
  19. Yesterday
  20. Magnolia Mud Research

    Lucy Rei Glazes?

    Roger that. Thanks.
  21. Min

    Lucy Rei Glazes?

    @Magnolia Mud Research,thanks for posting your ^3 Bronze recipe, I realize you and Terri both know it's not for food surfaces but in the event someone in the future reads this thread they should know that glaze is not food safe and to avoid the kiln fumes when firing.
  22. I set the glazes in my studio to be the correct thickness with a 6 second dip. People don't always pay attention to what they're doing, so a 3 second dip doesn't leave much leeway. If they go a second or two too long with 6 seconds, it's not such a big deal. How long you need to dip will depend on the viscosity of your glaze and the absorbency of your pots. If you bisque to cone 06, they'll take up water faster than if you bisque to cone 04. Stoneware isn't as absorbent as porcelain. Thin pots need a less watery glaze because they can't hold as much water.
  23. Rae Reich

    Used fire brick changed my plans

    Pretty setup, @Mark C.! I told the Gas Co that I would need "a million BTUs" (3 kilns) and they gave me a huge meter in 1979. Also replaced a couple of times since to one like yours. Actually never fired 2 ^10s while Raku-ing, but I could!!
  24. Magnolia Mud Research

    Lucy Rei Glazes?

    Terri I think you can find it in this book: Modern pots : Hans Coper, Lucie Rie & their contemporaries : the Lisa Sainsbury Collection Hans Coper, Lucie Rie & their contemporaries Hans Coper, Lucie Rie and their contemporaries Lisa Sainsbury Collection Author: Frankel, Cyril ISBN: 9780500975954 9780946009367 Publication Information: Norwich : University of East Anglia ; Wappingers Falls, NY : Distributed in the U.S. and Canada by Antique Collectors' Club, ©2000. I will not have access to the library until Tuesday afternoon to look it up. here is a recipe that I have used on 'stuff' for raku, cone 3 oxidation, cone 5 reduction/oxidation, and at cone 10 reduction. It is close to Lucie's concoction published in the book. the 'goldness' is related to thickness and it runs when thick. For me it worked best (gold forming) on white bodies and porcelain. I have worked with it applied at green ware states and bisque state. also have applied over and under other glazes (but don't remember the outcomes other not total disasters). The recipe is just a starting point. tweak everything to fit your clay body and firing conditions. I think the color depends on the elemental ratio of copper and manganese. During my playing with this line of decoration I also applied copper carbonate and manganese dioxide separately as suspensions in water (with some detergent to adjust surface attention) over the "bronze glaze" mixture. ∆3 Bronze . grams .Manganese dioxide 60 .Cu carbonate 10 .Red Clay - I used Redart 20 .EPK 10 .total 100 grams LT
  25. Mark C.

    Used fire brick changed my plans

    Patrick hers my meters-one is a large commercial meter the small one is for the house I have run 2 inch about 40 feet to get to two gas kilns and another kiln is also on the same 2 inch about 100 fret further Also my standby generator is tapped into this with 1 inch about 12 feet away around corner. I did all the plumbing-the gas company has replaced the big meter 3 times in 45 years-each time a smaller unit that handles handles load of BTUs the last photo is one side of my kiln firing last week-I added 4 extra burners a few years ago to give it a kick when needed, Now its and 8 burner kiln (35 cubic car kiln. The 2 inch comes straight up next to slab on both sides of kiln-its very clean install. Drops down to 3/4 full port ball vales and then 1/2 inch street ells at burners
  26. Just a quick note. When we formulate glazes for dipping we always prepare test tiles showing single and double dip results. Often if you look at the test tile it will be dipped diagonally once then the opposite diagonal a second time. The overlap area represents the look of a double dip. Since you are new, a three second dip is common but not set in stone so many glaze formulators will set their dipping glaze specific gravity to accommodate a three second dip and create a glaze that covers well with a single dip yet can be used artistically with a second dip. Experience is king here and you will develop your method for your look and result. As always testing first may save some of your wares, and you will be on your way to mastering your looks.
  27. Happens all the time-I fire every other week and picked these cone 10-and 11 packs out from some recent fires Do yours look like these cone 10/11 packs?????
  28. Bill Kielb

    Cone 10 and 11 melting at the same time

    I agree with Neil and add that your kiln has significant thermal mass so the cones may simply reflect stored heat work in the kiln. Most automatic kiln controllers default to between 80 and 120 degrees per hour for the final 250 degrees of firing. This is done so the controller has sufficient time to figure out the actual remaining heat work before shutting off the kiln. Cones contain flux and are intended to reflect vitrification of a fluxed body. Their temperature spreads are not uniform nor do the fall at one specific temperature. They are affected greatly by the rate during the last hour or two of firing. Cones are actually glazes several cones under their rating so they fall when expected to. More importantly, how did you like your results!
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