Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Today
  3. neilestrick

    Thoughts on the Cress FX-23 P

    The L&L vent can be attached to the side of any kiln. You just drill the necessary small holes through the brick, usually two or three 1/4" holes, and screw the collection box to the outer jacket. With Skutt vents, as long as the kiln stand is an open frame you can use it. There doesn't need to be a special mounting area for either type.
  4. Mokume

    Thoughts on the Cress FX-23 P

    This is an older kiln so there is no spot for a vent, you would prop the lid open during early stages of firing. It would have to be an overhead vent. I find it strange they didn’t have venting 20 years ago. Not sure if this is an issue, will be in the garage but don’t want “toxins” getting in to my laundry. Previous owner didn’t appear to have any vent installed in the room it is in.
  5. terrim8

    Bacon Cooker.jpg

    Thanks! Going to try a small one myself first though. I'm not a production potter so It'll be a one -off for me
  6. Perhaps your plate is porous enough to get hot because of moisture absorbed...
  7. It's either a thickness issue, or the bottom of the bowl isn't getting as hot as the sides since it's close to the shelf, which is basically a big heat sink. You could try slowing down the firing a little bit for the last 100 degrees.
  8. neilestrick

    Thoughts on the Cress FX-23 P

    You can attach any brand of downdraft vent to any kiln. Skutt vents just push up against the bottom of the kiln, the L&L can be screwed to the side of any kiln.
  9. liambesaw

    Mug Handles

    Not dry out, but I usually pull my handles (or take them out of the wet box) an hour or two before I use them. Gives them a chance to harden up a bit.
  10. Mokume

    Thoughts on the Cress FX-23 P

    I noticed that. Might be purchasing one of these used and was wondering about the vent situation/requirements. Plan to have it in a garage which has a whirly bird directly above the location but could have installed a vent if it had required. I know nothing about it other than it worked when last fired years ago and looks in good shape
  11. A Creasman

    Mug Handles

    Im new to throwing and tried out a new clay. It's pheonix, a white earthenware. I learned to make handles with red Rock and the first handle I made with pheonix was much harder to get the right form. It seemed too flexible and flimsy to hold shape. Should I let this clay dry out before forming and attaching my handle? Thanks
  12. Bill Kielb

    Jackeeze Matt Alterations

    Alright almost a plan make two glaze samples ( no dilly dallying, get this done) make progressions of each to vary gloss level ( good proactive idea) put them in the test kiln, pull them out tomorrow, get some really good pictures of the surface and get them to Grace to see if she has interest. if yes - solidify these recipes maybe spodumene, 10-25% clay, you name it ......... the works, these will be solid! All a great plan until....... out of all the kilns available I need the little test kiln because this is an 04 lowfire glaze and quite frankly we don’t fire any. Of course one of our sculpture artists has the test kiln booked solid until Friday! so wait till Friday afternoon we will, and fire then. Meanwhile the test tiles are stuck in shelf prison along with other stuff waiting patiently on the rack. They are drying patiently of course. Till Saturday then - go kiln waiting!
  13. Yesterday
  14. liambesaw

    figurative sculpture surface

    Try getting the piece wet first. Air is escaping the bisque
  15. ColorBaby

    figurative sculpture surface

    Okay, I just used my first ever batch of Stephenson's Slip/Engobe. over a bisqued piece. Used it pretty thick then saw that it was cracking so I thinned it. , it is bubbling!! Brush over and the bubbles come back!!Rubbing with green kitchen scrubber not helping, what on earth are these bubbles?? I bisqued the piece at 08 so it would stay pretty porous, b ut left it out in my studio for about a month.
  16. Chilly

    Time for a New Thermocouple?

    Oh yes, firing down is a must, luckily controller is 9 segments and 9 programs. I've been doing fused, stained and copper-foiled glass at a studio for a while. This will be my first glass firing in my kiln.
  17. TY Mark: i have to give credit to Holly Goring at CM. She started editing this article back in august or so. I think her favorite email response was " chemistry heavy." She did an excellent job of organizing my randomness. https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/ceramics-monthly/ceramic-supplies/ceramic-raw-materials/techno-file-clay-body-shopping/# this link will take you directly to it. Tom
  18. neilestrick

    clay water content

    Clay holds water. Silica and feldspar, not so much. The less clay you have in it, the less water it needs. A porcelain body might on be 50% clay, so it needs a lot less water than a stoneware body. When I was manager of the clay production line at A.R.T, I'd adjust the moisture level of our porcelain by 1 gallon of water at a time to an 1850 pound batch. As for how much water a body should have in it, I don't think there's a number that can be assigned. Some people like softer clay, some people like stiffer clay. Some companies mix the same body two ways- one softer for schools where kids will be using it, one stiffer for potters. Your clay body is almost an equal parts body, which should work really, really well. We used a lot of that in grad school, and it's a great all around throwing body. There's no need for the PV Clay in it though. Just go 20% Hawthorn and you'll probably see a big difference. I'm a huge fan of kaolin in clay bodies. It contributes to particle size distribution, and reduces the overly-plastic and sticky feel of ball clay. I like Tom's recommendation of cutting the ball clay to 15% and increasing the EPK.
  19. C.Banks

    clay water content

    ugh :) please excuse the reading comprehension failure and thanks for the reply
  20. Grace london

    Jackeeze Matt Alterations

    Amazing that you're doing this. Can't thank you enough for helping me out. I couldn't find CMC in London- Is AMACO Gum Solution the same thing? What a beautiful studio! I will send you a photo of my dungeon tomorrow : )
  21. Bill Kielb

    Jackeeze Matt Alterations

    Original recipe only had 5% clay. Like to see at least 10% for suspension. No calcining right now. Sorry was busy making so now time to edit this to make sense. Yes final glaze will be decent and solid. For now I would like to get this on a tile and make sure she is relatively interested. Then standardize it so it mixes easily etc..... looking at her site and pictures I think this is very doable for her, but you never know till you try.
  22. glazenerd

    clay water content

    C.Banks in my article: the WOPL (water of plasticity) is given for individual clay varities. WOPL for kaolin is 26 ( grams of water to 100 grams) of clay. Ball clays run 30 to 38. Bentonites and hectorites run 38-40. Macaloid is highly refined calcium hectorite. V-Gum T is synthetic, although some suggest it is also a processed from of hectorite. The WOPL for a blended body will be less because you are adding minerals- silica, feldspars. Your recipe is basically a 50/50 porcelain blend. 20% kaolin, 20% OM4, and 12% fireclay. Your SiAl ratio is off: 71% silica is a bit low- should run in the 74-76% range. Alumina in typical porcelain bodies run 17-20% molar. Not a fan of EPK in clay bodies: it has a SSA of 28.56- which applied means fine grain. Kaolin holds water on its platelets, ball clay absorbs water differently. Kaolin being a 1:1 structure means water acts as a lubricant: which is why porcelain is always softer than stoneware. Ball clay is a 2:1 particle, meaning it has an inner core: which absorbs water. Which is why stoneware feels denser than porcelain. your recipe is a hybrid of sorts: does not really follow porcelain or stoneware standards. A pure porcelain would hold 20% water typically! and stoneware 22-24% typically. So 26% water content is high and comes from 2 things- 20% OM4 and plastic vitrox. You have a total clay content of 52%: OM4 accounts for nearly 40% of the total clay content: with an additional 8% PV. In clay theory: maximum plastic content should not exceed 30% of total clay content The OM4 absorbed water when you mixed it, the water from throwing caused it to reach its maximum plastic limit: resulting in fatigue.. Which you called floppy. Cut the OM4 to 15%, lose the PV. Increase EPK proportionately. At cone 10- KnaO should run 4.29% molar. Typical You should never ask a Nerd why? You get these protracted answers. Actually I was not finished, but alas. liam: bentonite is the plasticizer. Tom
  23. Bill Kielb

    Jackeeze Matt Alterations

    The original recipe that you sent me on Glazy included 1g or CMC. I am assuming that was to improve brushability as well. Making your glaze right now and making it into a little video for members here about glaze tuning. Hope all goes well though, never know. Spodumene would be better but let’s see if this works for you then min has already converted to spodumene. not the best picture ......but
  24. Grace london

    Jackeeze Matt Alterations

    Incredibly generous, the thought and attention you have put into this. I have a very limited glaze lab, but I could order some Spodumene and Talc in the next week or two. If you think it will work? I'm not making major amounts here, in fact a 500mls of each only. Keen to experiment. Actually microwaved a jar of my glaze today and saw those crystals melt immediately then added a little bentonite and it made it more brush-able all right...
  25. liambesaw

    clay water content

    Looks like plainsman probably uses veegum or macaloid instead of ball clay for plasticity? I'm guessing that's what they mean by micro-fine bentonite. That means they can up the feldspar content instead of adding a bunch of ball clay. That's just my guess.
  26. Stephen

    Why make functional ware?

    I guess think this whole handmade versus commercial mass produced comparison thing is pointless for customers to go through. If someone is comparing a $5 Walmart mug to a $50 hand thrown one they should just buy the Walmart one. My brother in-law used to buy expensive tailor made suits. Me, I can't wrap my mind around a three-four grand suit but he could and couldn't careless what Men's Warehouse was selling suits for. Same goes for people that buy expensive art tile for a custom project and/or pop for five-ten grand painting for behind the couch. Home depot and Hobby lobby would come in for pennies on the dollar and the tile would be fine and the picture an exact knockoff of an old master but those people don't care and don't look. ...but that same person will laugh at a $300 pair of sneakers. To each his own.
  27. I'm working with a clay that has a tendency to flop with little warning. From what little I know this can be a problem with plastic clay bodies holding more water than more forgiving, less plastic bodies. So with this in mind I'm looking at making adjustments but I'm getting conflicting information on what some accepted water content values are. Plainsman P700 has a % water of 23.5 - 24.5 Plainsman describes P700 as "our most vitreous cone 10 white body, it is the closest thing we have to a true translucent porcelain body. It is a mix of 50% Grolleg kaolin with feldspar and silica. We also add micro-fine bentonite to improve its plasticity." In the Febreuary Ceramics Monthly (thanks Tom) the water contents are significantly higher than the figures from Plainsman. I'm wondering are clays so different in the Unites States? I'm curious because the clay I'm working with holds aproximately 26% and is mixed up as a high fire, buff, stoneware. It works well for the most part. Fires to an 11 with no issues and kitchen tested absorption showed it was near zero at cone 10. But it doesn't stand up as well as the commercial Plainsman clays and I want to know why. thoughts much appreciated 20 epk 20 OM-4 ball clay 20 silica 20 custer potash feldspar 12 hawthorn Bond Clay 8 pv clay Percentage Analysis by weight 71.13 % SiO2 23.24 % Al2O3 3.06 % K2O 0.73 % Na2O 0.28 % CaO 0.32 % MgO 0.59 % Fe2O3 0.05 % P2O5 0.59 % TiO2
  28. Dick White

    Wax for horse hair pottery.

    I too use the Future acrylic floor wax, now branded as Pledge Floor Care Finish. As nobody has linoleum floors that need to be waxed anymore, most stores selling household care products don't carry it, so I now order it online from the big river in South America. I apply 2 light coats with a foam sponge, and you can handle it very soon after applying the wax. Straight from the bottle, it will be pretty glossy, but I've found I can reduce the gloss somewhat by cutting the wax half and half with water.
  1. Load more activity
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.