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  2. Too true! Same glaze, but - different kiln, altitude, barometric pressure, material sources, application, firing schedule, bumblebee farts - YMMV!!!
  3. Today
  4. Rae Reich

    Another new B

    Live long and prosper sincerely rae
  5. Durable, absorbant, and replaceable. Some of them are a bit rough, but others are smoother. best, Pres
  6. Just buy some lube made for this process-its cheap enough https://www.axner.com/pure-lube.aspx or you can struggle with corn starch and olive oil or whatnot also picking the right forms also helps not all forms can be cast well.
  7. Alanhoff, just 30 seconds at a time until they heat up enough to draw the water out. Then I pull them out and let them air for a bit. Repeat as needed.
  8. How could I find the name of the guy in the Pacific Northwest that is doing the acrylic like flow glazing? My results so far are quite mediocre and I could use whatever guidance I could get from him

    1. Mark C.

      Mark C.

      My old dentist bought some of his plates in a gift shop in Cannon Beach Or.-she has since moved to Idaho. I also saw his work at a show I was at 10 years ago-

      You can add acrylic binder as MMR said or do it with colored slips as in thew video

      Even iof you found this artist he may not be willing to share Doc-not all are open to that idea .

    2. Gabby

      Gabby

      There is an Oregon Potters Association and a Washington State ceramics association as well. You might contact them.

      The Oregon association has a very large show in April, more than 100 potters, I think. There are probably illustrated rosters.

       

  9. GreyBird

    Plaster for wedging table

    Thanks, is it as absorbent and durable as plaster?
  10. GreyBird

    Hudson River Clay

    Yes, I had expected to possibly use it as is, as a low fire Earthenware at cone 06.
  11. Mark C.

    Hudson River Clay

    Many of those found local clays will need additives to raise the temps to make them work at higher tempos like cone 6 or 10.
  12. Mark C.

    Plaster for wedging table

    Cement board is for backing tile surfaces and goes by many brands-durarock-hardie backer etc. Its at those big box stores.Comes in various sizes.
  13. GreyBird

    Plaster for wedging table

    I never heard of cement board. I'll look it up. Thanks! Does it remove water like plaster?
  14. Joy pots

    Plaster for wedging table

    Why not slide in a piece for cement board the size of the table for a wedge board. My husband screwed an L shaped joined to hold it in place.
  15. oldlady

    Plaster for wedging table

    ahhh............. a really handy storage space with those big drawers.
  16. GreyBird

    Plaster for wedging table

    Yea, it is part of a larger structure that I could not take apart. Keep in mind though I screwed the front piece of wood on thinking I would be filling it with plaster. This morning I took it back off as my plan changed. So the whole front is open to rest your arms on. In any case, I prefer to work at the red table because I can site at a chair and work where the supply bench I would have to stand. I am not fond of standing for long periods of time. LOL. See in pic.. I started moving stuff back as I use it as more of a bench for tools and such.
  17. GreyBird

    Hudson River Clay

    Excellent info. Thank you! So I if it is humus, than I can still use it for glaze recipes but probably not for throwing or hand building as it would not fire up well. Would that be correct? I imagine if it has a lot of organic material that burns out during firing, it would be weak when fired.
  18. I think that is what has been happening to me--just thinking about making so many changes! I think I will take your advice and go back to the schedule that seemed to be working, test new glazes, and go on from there. At the moment, I don't sell that much; I'm not a production potter, it's been more of an avocation for me, and somehow this summer got too busy to keep up with pottery. I would like to get myself on more of a schedule in the studio though, and go back to where I'm making more, as I seem to have done a few years ago. So...making money is not the primary goal at the moment. When I need to get finished stuff out of the way, then I'll need to sell! But I think I will take your advice and go back to the schedule that seemed to be working, test new glazes, and go on from there. Thanks for your insight and advice!
  19. oldlady

    Plaster for wedging table

    your picture is fine, but where you see an Art table, i see a trough. a place with sides that would interfere with putting my arm down on the horizontal surface. the brown part of your art table. it looks like a long tray as it stands now. if you unscrew the brown part and flip it upside down, you might have a flat, horizontal tabletop. maybe, i don't know what is underneath the board that is holding your fan, just screw holes or something else. or, just put a piece of plywood across the whole thing for a top.
  20. At the height you have, it may work very well as a finishing table, add a banding wheel to it, and you have a good work area for finishing pieces. best, Pres
  21. glazenerd

    Hudson River Clay

    Three types of humus: mor, moder, and mull. mor is basically potting soil or compost. Mull is the same basically, but acidic because it comes from sub tropical rain forest. Moder is commonly called black or dark brown clay. It has a weak crystalline structure, and is mixed with whatever native soils ( clays) around it. It is the most plastic of all clays: which are rated by CEC ( cation exchange.) Common ball clays run 7-11 CEC, bentonites run 75-150 CEC, and humus tops out at 300 CEC. The very high organic carbon content gives it the black color. It has a sub micron particle structure, which also plays into its plasticity index. The 300 CEC index also means it will hold water for an extended period in comparison to other clay types. i have not seen chemical analysis on humus, but I would expect to see low alumina ( under 10%), higher calcium levels, and higher silica levels.. Much will depend on the clay types it has mixed with. Humus will make silly putty look "short." t
  22. leigharttx

    Paragon LT-3 Kiln Over Firing

    Yeah, I adjusted all of the sitter parts first and test fired and the cone was bent in half and nearly touching end to end. The weight had fallen or was adjusted too low from the trigger, but I couldn't fathom how that would have caused an over fire. I've never noticed it being too close (hanging) on the trigger or not holding during firing either. I went ahead and adjusted it to the recommended 1/16" the adjustment guide said to. I'm in contact with Paragon and I'm going to order new relay wires. I'm almost positive that that's the culprit. Thank you all for your recommendations and suggestions on this! I'm ready to have my kiln back to normal.
  23. GreyBird

    Plaster for wedging table

    I agree I think it is too high for a wedging table. It is 35" tall and add 2 to 4" of plaster and, well, too high. I just liked the idea of having that nice horizontal apace, as you mentioned, for work. I'm not sure what you are referring to when you mention the "underside of that bid tray"? I know my shot is cluttered with stuff because I had cleared off the top of the art supply cabinet in prep for my big plaster project so it can be hard to see exactly what's what but there is a big red worktable in the center and the art table against the back wall.
  24. oldlady

    Plaster for wedging table

    looking at all that nice,horizontal surface you were planning to use for plaster made me think about the height of that table and how comfortable (or not) it would be for wedging. i do not wedge often and use a lower tabletop for it so i can lean some weight into the spiral. i would consider using the underside of that big tray as a worktable. that would depend on your height and what you might need to do to flip it over. beautiful daylight through the window, it would make a marvelous place to assemble things, add handles, etc. just about elbow height is very good for your posture if you stand to work. you might think about it. trying to work inside a trough would be limiting but the underside, yes, it might work well.
  25. GreyBird

    Hudson River Clay

    Is humus elastic like clay? and Slippery? and does it have the viscosity of clay? because this acts a lot like clay. I can roll a coil and wrap it around my finger 'til the cows come him with no cracking. I'm pretty sure it's clay. I googled humus and it says it's a topsoil layer of dead plants and such. I'm not sure how one could mistake that for clay found 10' down along the side of a riverbed. What is the humus you are speaking of? What would the differences be? I have a microscope, is there a way I can tell under a microscope? I will definitely keep you posted. I should get results sometime during the following week but that's going to be a mineral breakdown how will that differ between clay and humus? Thanks!
  26. glazenerd

    Hudson River Clay

    Will be interested to see the test results. From the color and description: suspect you have humus. ( not to be confused with potting soil).
  27. GreyBird

    Plaster for wedging table

    OK, so after a good night sleep, I've decided to not fill the tabletop with plaster, but instead to make wood frames and pour individual 2'x2' slabs. This way I can move them around the studio or line them up on the table if I want and the edges will be open so they can expel moisture better as Mark makes a good point about the slabs drying better that way.
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